Artists in the Lime Light: A Conversation with Thinh Nguyen, Debra Bianculli, Olivier Mirguet, Melanie Moore, Alan Nakagawa, Paulin Paris, and Jane Gillespie Pryor

Artists, l-r: Thinh Nguyen, Alan Nakagawa, Melanie Moore, Debra Bianculli, Jane Gillespie Pryor, and Paulin Paris. Hawthorne, CA, 2014. Photo courtesy Jill Thayer, Ph.D.

Artists, l-r: Thinh Nguyen, Alan Nakagawa, Melanie Moore, Debra Bianculli, Jane Gillespie Pryor, and Paulin Paris. Hawthorne, CA, 2014. Photo courtesy Jill Thayer, Ph.D.

A Conversation with

THINH NGUYEN 

DEBRA BIANCULLI 

OLIVIER MIRGUET 

MELANIE MOORE 

ALAN NAKAGAWA 

PAULIN PARIS 

JANE GILLESPIE PRYOR

June 12, 2014

Conducted at thinhstudio, Hawthorne, California

Interviewer: Jill Thayer, Ph.D.

Interview with Thinh Nguyen (curator); Alan Nakagawa, Melanie Moore, Debra Bianculli, and Jane Gillespie Pryor (Lime Light exhibition artists); with Paulin Paris and Olivier Mirguet (Cordary Avenue studio artists).

I was invited by Artist/Curator Thinh Nguyen to have a discussion on artist emergence with the exhibiting artists of “Lime Light” (June 7-14, 2014) at thinhstudio in Hawthorne, California. Thinh, an MFA graduate from Claremont Graduate University read my CGU doctoral dissertation, “Artist Emergence in Contemporary Culture: A Dialectic in Social and Material Conditions of Southern California Artists (ProQuest/UMI, 2011), and asked that I share my experiences and findings with the group in the show he curated. I wanted to document the artists’ insights in the continuing dialogue on the topic, and most importantly, learn of their contributions to contemporary culture beyond this exceptional exhibition.

Limelight Artists

“Lime Light” Exhibition Graphic, Designed by Thinh Nguyen, 2014

Jill Thayer: Today is Thursday June 12th 2014 and I have the pleasure of speaking with curator Thinh Nguyen, the artists of “Lime Light” exhibition including Alan Nakagawa, Melanie Moore, Debra Bianculli, and Jane Gillespie Pryor; and Cordary Avenue studio artists Paulin Paris and Olivier Mirguet. Thank you for inviting me to share in a discussion of artist emergence. As we begin, please introduce yourselves and briefly describe your work.

Thinh Nguyen: Hi. My name is Thinh Nguyen. I am a conceptual blending artist, as well as a curator, writer, and cultural developer.

Melanie Moore: My name is Melanie Moore. I am a painter and I’ve been doing ink paintings on paper that deal with micro and macro mutations, biological mutations.

Debra Bianculli: My name is Debra Bianculli. I am an artist, primarily a painter. My recent body of work includes the topic of genetic modification and industrial agriculture.

Olivier Mirguet: My name is Olivier Mirguet. I’m a photographer and I work mostly with photography. I also do installations.

Paulin Paris: My name is Paris. I’m an artist. I do paintings, sculpture, murals, and photography.

Jane Gillespie Pryor: I am Jane Gillespie Pryor. I am an artist, primarily a sculptor, working with plastic and found wood. My recent body of work deals with traps and shelters, and animal skins and the patterns that inhabit those.

Alan Nakagawa: Alan Nakagawa. I’m a sound artist.

JT: Thank you everyone.

Artists: Thank you.

JT: I would like to discuss the influences of your work and relationship to the culture, and the experiences you’ve had in the art market. Many artists just out of graduate school and those who did not attend college wonder how their work may fit into the broader discourse. How do they emerge? This was the focus of my doctoral dissertation at Claremont Graduate University entitled, “Artist Emergence in Contemporary Culture: A Dialectic in Social and Material Conditions of Southern California Artists,” (UMI/Proquest, 2011). In the study, I interviewed 30 art market participants including: artists, curators, gallerists, critics, and art administrators in exploring the mechanisms that inform artist emergence. The artists came from various socio-economic backgrounds and I discovered a number of factors that contributed to their success such as personal (family and friends) and professional (industry, peer, and patron) support structures, belief systems, networking, talent/passion/drive, marketing strategies, and other signifiers in their career pursuit. I was fascinated by their trajectories and documented their stories, which contributed to the 973-page dissertation.

Our discussion is a continuation of this by adding insight to the discourse through your experiences and observations. Since our graduate study at CGU Art, I followed Thinh’s work as an artist and curator. I offer my congrats to you all on the success of “Lime Light.” It’s nice to revisit the topic of artist emergence and hear your comments, as many artists do not discuss how they achieve visibility in the art world. I hold a respect for the aesthetic and a proprietary understanding that this level of work commands. As artists, most have an inherent desire to gain public awareness for their work. Your insights on these and other issues will contribute to our discussion. Thank you for being a part of this exchange.

Melanie, what childhood factors contributed to your career as an artist?

MM: I would say, the biggest childhood factor is the fact that we did not have television in the sense that we did not have cable TV. We had a TV, we watched movies, but on a day-day basis just to entertain myself, I would draw. Then the drawing became how I thought about the world and how I processed the world. I think that if I had watched TV shows every day, I maybe would still be creative, but I wouldn’t have that really deep background in drawing and the kind of that love for it as deep as I do.

JT: How about you, Debra, are there any childhood factors that helped pave your way as an artist?

DB: Yes. The neighborhood that I lived in was sort of rural within a suburb. It was on a wooded hill and the only street to get around it was a major roadway so, I couldn’t really get anywhere. We lived on a couple of acres of woods and I didn’t really have any neighborhood children that were my age. There was one girl across the way. I spent a lot of time with my brother; a lot of time in the woods, and so when I wasn’t doing those sorts of things, I was making art.

JT: Olivier?

OM: I used to live in France. I grew up in France, in a small village in Eastern France, near Nancy. I was always interested in visual things and I started to photograph maybe at 12 or 13 years old. I wanted to be a photographer. That’s weird because I was thinking about this, when I did the installation and the show with the picture of the helicopter at night [“Supervision L.A.” May 3, 2013 at Lacen Project]. I was maybe at 13 or 14, I was collecting articles from the local newspaper, and only such weird stories about wars and everything­­­­, very dark stories. That’s funny because it makes sense with what I do now and it’s all connected.

JT: Many artists don’t think about upbringing and their childhood though many things influence where they are today. You may not want to think about it, but it’s important to embrace that because it’s part of who you are.

OM: It’s still there. You don’t think about it.

JT: Yes. We realize how far we’ve come. I have a number of questions. It’s going to be an ongoing dialogue.

Alan notes that Melanie must leave for work and requests that the conversation begins with her.

OM: Just ask her [referring to to Melanie]. For the moment, you are on the grill.

MM: It’s so great to hear everyone’s responses though.

JT: What artists or genres informed or influenced your work?

MM: I have a lot of influences. I would definitely say the color field painters such as Morris Louis and Helen Frankenthaler, the stain painting, and Sharon Ellis actually got me into painting. I saw her work and I was like, “I want to be a painter, I want to paint just like that.” I don’t paint like her at all. [Laughs] I just saw her work again in Santa Monica, she had a show up and I felt really connected to it even though my work is so different. That was really interesting to come back and see it in person, because it’s so graceful and beautiful. I would say Terry Winters has also been a big influence for many, many years.

JT: Most often, there is something from an art historical reference that influences your work or how you see the world. I see color palettes from the Fauvists or Post-Impressionists, perhaps constructs from previous movements that may circle back around. What is the relationship of your work to the culture?

MM: What I think about is these microbiological mutations. It’s me thinking about where we all came from. Where, and how we got the way we were. Even though I know there’s a lot of science documentation and all of that, there’s also this mystery and beauty, and how everything got put together. Even on a day-to-day basis that could be seen, that micro little relationship can be seen in a relationship between people as well. Growing through their life, and changing and interacting with other people. A lot of times my forms are interacting with each other. It’s almost like a little story sometimes they tell.

JT: Yes, an excellent parallel between microbiology and the human condition. Is your organization process linear or non-linear?

MM: I would say non-linear. I’m all over the place, things circle back around all the time. In fact, after I graduated with my MFA, I felt I was just one step in front of where I was when I graduated with my BA. Of course, I had a wealth of knowledge and experience, and I had seven years between my BA and my MFA, but somehow, these ideas that I had started then had circled back around, they were always there but they had come to the surface more. Everything seems to circle around in my studio. I have several things going on at once that I hop from one thing to the next, and everything informs one another.

JT: Is your intent to express an idea or feeling, or is the idea or feeling a result of your work? In other words, do you have a preliminary intention or does that come forth upon viewing the work?

MM: I would definitely say I have an initial intention. There’s definitely a nugget that the work grows from but as I go through the work, the original idea starts to fade and then I start to respond to what it has become. I try not to anchor myself so much to that original idea.

JT: Sometimes the work evolves on the canvas or in an installation, and these serendipitous effects occur, results that are unplanned and better than you could ever imagine. This freedom is good, but other times, boundaries can also incite the creative process. Do you feel alienated or connected to a broader community when you work?

MM: Do I feel my work is connected with a group of artists in a way?

JT: Are you solitary when you work focusing solely within yourself or are you open to an exchange with others during the process?

MM: I definitely enjoy my studio time and being by myself, but inviting colleagues in to do studio visits. Especially just in this past year, I’ve done that more now because this is a new, body of work for me. I worked on it and then getting it out there, so to speak. Having other people see the work and comment on it has been really invigorating and gets me energy to go back in the studio. It’s like, some public times, some private times, some public times, some private times.

Melanie Moore, "Lime Light," Installation view, June 2014

Melanie Moore, “Lime Light,” Installation view, June 2014

Melanie Moore, "Transition 01," Acrylic ink on paper, 22 x 30 inches, 2013

Melanie Moore, “Transition 01,” Acrylic ink on paper, 22 x 30″, 2013

Melanie Moore, "With Varying Success," Acrylic ink on paper, 22 x 30 inches, 2014

Melanie Moore, “With Varying Success,” Acrylic ink on paper, 22 x 30″, 2014

Melanie Moore, "Spore," Acrylic ink on paper, 30 x 22 inches, 2014

Melanie Moore, “Spore,” Acrylic ink on paper, 30 x 22″, 2014

Melanie Moore, "Separation 03," Acrylic ink on paper, 22 x 30 inches, 2014

Melanie Moore, “Separation 03,” Acrylic ink on paper, 22 x 30″, 2014

Melanie Moore, "Flux," Acrylic ink on paper, 22 x 30 inches, 2013

Melanie Moore, “Flux,” Acrylic ink on paper, 22 x 30″, 2013

LightnessFormInstallation02012

“Unbearable Lightness of Form,” Installation view, Melanie Moore & David French, Autonomie, 2012

JT: Do you draw inspiration from seeing art or do you prefer to focus on your own process?

MM: Looking at art is really important, but I think there is a fine line. It depends where I am in my creative process in the studio. Sometimes it can be frustrating when you go out and see too much stuff at once. If maybe your stuff, you don’t see it fitting in with some other things that you are seeing. You can get a little frustrated with yourself, you’re like, “Oh, well, I’m really excited with what I’m doing, but I don’t see how it fits in with the fabric of the L.A. art world,” especially, when you’re going to gallery shows. For me, it’s always been a touch and go… I mean, I’m always looking at art, but I know at times it can be a little overwhelming and sometimes I have to step back and be, “You know what, I’m not going to look at anything for a while.”

JT: That’s true. In my last gallery trek, I did not see any common narratives in the work. Each exhibit was unique. The methodologies were fresh. That is the best way I can describe it. It’s good to view what’s out there as we continue on our own path.

[Melanie excuses herself to leave].

JT: Melanie, it has been a pleasure speaking with you, continued success with your career.

MM: It was such a pleasure. I’m so sorry I have to leave. Thank you everyone for accommodating me.

AN: We’ve got a preview of the questions now. We’re thinking about it while you’re asking them.

OM: Now, the answers are going to be completely different.

JT: When I was interviewing the artists for my paper, many of them said, “I never really thought about that.” Or “Yes, it’s interesting to actually vocalize that, as sometimes you don’t take time to think about these things.” I really enjoy hearing everyone’s comments.

PP: That would be a great question, I think.

JT: Today, artists are taking control of their careers and marketing their “brand” through online platforms and social media integration. I hate to use the term “brand,” in referencing fine art, but there are certain degrees of that context. Art marketing has greatly changed from the days of galleries promoting a stable of artists.

The conversation turns to the artists’ education. Some pursued transdisciplinary areas such as: Philosophy, Communication, and Journalism concurrent to undergraduate and graduate degrees in Fine Art. The artists attended Claremont Graduate University; California State University, Los Angeles; University of California, Irvine; Syracuse University; School of Journalism, Strasbourg, France; Ecole Nationale des Beaux Arts Paris, Paris X Nanterre France; and Ecole Van Der Kellen, Brussels, Belgium.

JT: Alan, what people or genres influenced your path?

AN: Art Blakey.

JT: Would you describe his work?

AN: Art Blakey is primarily a bebop drummer. He had a good group called the Jazz Messengers. Although he comes from the bebop tradition, he wanted to instill in the younger musicians the training of bebop so he cultivated quite a few of the famous jazz musicians and composers that we know today. Supposedly, the moment they were good or he felt like they were great, he would fire them and hire somebody else. I like that.

JT: Do you abide to that professional acumen?

AN: Yes. Absolutely.

Alan Nakagawa, "Organ of Corti Part 2," 2014. Media: Video, Sound Beds, Sound Loop, Lighting Dimensions: Two Rooms Installation: In two rooms Venue: Cordary Arts Name of show: Lime Light

Alan Nakagawa, “Organ of Corti Part 2,” 2014. Installation view. Video, Sound Beds, Sound Loop, Lighting. Two rooms, Cordary Arts, “Lime Light.”

Alan Nakagawa, "Organ of Corti Part 2," 2014. Media: Video, Sound Beds, Sound Loop, Lighting Dimensions: Two Rooms Installation: In two rooms Venue: Cordary Arts Name of show: Lime Light

Alan Nakagawa, “Organ of Corti Part 2,” 2014. Installation view. Video, Sound Beds, Sound Loop, Lighting. Two Rooms, Cordary Arts, “Lime Light.”

Alan Nakagawa, "Title: Moondog Pole," 2014. Media: Wood drum, Sonotube, paint, bass strings, electronic, sound loop Dimensions: 4’ x 2.5’ Installation: Installed onto existing utility pole Venue: Cordary Arts Name of show: Lime Light

Alan Nakagawa, “Moondog Pole,” 2014. Installation view. Wood drum, Sonotube, paint, bass strings, electronic, sound loop, 4’ x 2.5’, Installed onto existing utility pole, Cordary Arts, “Lime Light.”

Alan Nakagawa, "Organ of Corti Part 2," 2014. Media: Video, Sound Beds, Sound Loop, Lighting Dimensions: Two Rooms Installation: In two rooms Venue: Cordary Arts Name of show: Lime Light

Alan Nakagawa, “Organ of Corti Part 2,” 2014. Installation view. Video, Sound Beds, Sound Loop, Lighting. Two Rooms, Cordary Arts, “Lime Light.”

Alan Nakagawa, "Organ of Corti (excerpt)," 2013. Media: Live music, 15 minutes, Sound Beds, Video Dimensions: REDCAT, Disney Hall, Los Angeles CA Installation: REDCAT Venue: REDCAT Name of show: Spring Studio 2013

Alan Nakagawa, “Organ of Corti (excerpt),” 2013. Installation view. Live music, 15 minutes, Sound Beds, Video. REDCAT, Disney Hall, Los Angeles, CA, “Spring Studio 2013.”

Alan Nakagawa, "Organ of Corti (excerpt)," 2013. Media: Live music, 15 minutes, Sound Beds, Video Dimensions: REDCAT, Disney Hall, Los Angeles CA Installation: REDCAT Venue: REDCAT Name of show: Spring Studio 2013

Alan Nakagawa, “Organ of Corti (excerpt),” 2013. Installation view. Live music, 15 minutes, Sound Beds, Video. REDCAT, Disney Hall, Los Angeles, CA, “Spring Studio 2013.”

Alan Nakagawa, "Organ of Corti," 2013. Media: Live music, 5 hours, Sound Beds, Lighting Dimensions: Sound Beds are 6’ x 4’ x 9” Installation: Former Armory Vehicle Garage, East LA REP, Los Angeles CA Venue: East LA REP Name of show: Organ of Corti

Alan Nakagawa, “Organ of Corti,” 2013. Installation view. Live music, 5 hours, Sound Beds, Lighting. Sound Beds are 6’ x 4’ x 9”. Former Armory Vehicle Garage, East LA REP, Los Angeles, CA, “Organ of Corti.”

Alan Nakagawa, "Organ of Corti," 2013. Media: Live music, 5 hours, Sound Beds, Lighting Dimensions: Sound Beds are 6’ x 4’ x 9” Installation: Former Armory Vehicle Garage, East LA REP, Los Angeles CA Venue: East LA REP Name of show: Organ of Corti

Alan Nakagawa, “Organ of Corti,” 2013. Installation view. Live music, 5 hours, Sound Beds, Lighting. Sound Beds are 6’ x 4’ x 9”. Former Armory Vehicle Garage, East LA REP, Los Angeles, CA, “Organ of Corti.”

Alan Nakagawa, "Organ of Corti," 2013. Media: Live music, 5 hours, Sound Beds, Lighting Dimensions: Sound Beds are 6’ x 4’ x 9” Installation: Former Armory Vehicle Garage, East LA REP, Los Angeles CA Venue: East LA REP Name of show: Organ of Corti

Alan Nakagawa, “Organ of Corti,” 2013. Installation view. Live music, 5 hours, Sound Beds, Lighting. Sound Beds are 6’ x 4’ x 9”. Former Armory Vehicle Garage, East LA REP, Los Angeles, CA, “Organ of Corti.”

JT: I find there is a confluence of performing and visual arts. Kandinsky was influenced by music. How about you Jane?

JGP: When I was getting into sculpture, I would say a lot of female sculptors like Louise Bourgeois, Eva Hesse, Lee Bontecou, and Tim Hawkinson. I’d say now who’s influencing my work, I think about Liz Larner, Wolfgang Laib, and Robert Gober. It’s an odd collection of people, I think.

JT: I see that in your work.

JGP: Oh, good.

JT: What about you Paris?

PP: I think my first influence was my great grandfather Carolus Duran. He was a painter, a portraitist mostly. He was Sargeant’s teacher. His paintings were at the Louvre, now they are at the Musée d’Orsay and the Metropolitan, among other museums, his family portraits were around when I grew up, it was the first influence. Also on the family side, my father is a real draughtsman, I always loved to look at him drawing, just to see how much you can convey with a pencil, it’s a very mysterious thing because it’s just a line and it’s so simple.

JT: There’s a purity and honesty to drawing.

PP: Yes, because it’s very clear. It’s transparent somehow. Then after that, doing philosophy studies, I was very influenced by Marcel Duchamp, because he opened so many doors. Before him, art was almost a guild corporation with specialists working in very precise and definitive ways. And certainly, Duchamp opened the door, the windows, and that’s where we are now. What’s funny is that it took a little bit of time before that… things became actual. I think the other big influence was Warhol. Warhol did somehow the same thing as Duchamp, but in another way regarding the pop culture and the object. Suddenly, if you add the Ready-Made plus the object, it’s where we are. It’s where I feel I am, and then I have to deal with that, which is not an easy task. I think it’s something working within my work that’s influenced.

Letters from LA-1

Letters from LA-2

Paulin Paris, “Letters from Los Angeles,” Jack Rutberg Fine Arts (Nov. 17 – Dec. 22, 2012).

Paulin Paris, "Symbolic Symbol," 2013 Acrylic and gold leaf on hardboard, 12 x 12 x 2"

Paulin Paris, “Symbolic Symbol,” 2013 Acrylic and gold leaf on hardboard, 12 x 12 x 2″

Paulin Paris, "Space Cast #11, 1, 2013, Papier mâché,acrylic and neon paint, 22 x 11 x 4.25"

Paulin Paris, “Space Cast #11, 1, 2013, Papier mâché,acrylic and neon paint, 22 x 11 x 4.25”

Paulin Paris, "Space Cast #7, 1 "Bond Venus," 2013  (Front). Papier mâché, wood, rope and metal rings, wax, 31 x 15 x 8"

Paulin Paris, “Space Cast #7, 1 “Bond Venus,” 2013 (Front). Papier mâché, wood, rope and metal rings, wax, 31 x 15 x 8″

Paulin Paris, "Space Cast #7, 1 "Bond Venus," 2013  (Back). Papier mâché, wood, rope and metal rings, wax, 31 x 15 x 8"

Paulin Paris, “Space Cast #7, 1 “Bond Venus,” 2013 (Back). Papier mâché, wood, rope and metal rings, wax, 31 x 15 x 8″

Paulin Paris, "ROGUE Design: 5 from CA," Installation view. LA Contemporary Gallery (July 10 - Sept. 10, 2010)

Paulin Paris, “ROGUE Design: 5 from CA,” Installation view. LA Contemporary Gallery (July 10 – Sept. 10, 2010)

Paulin Paris, "Artwareness:  Marquetry Paintings," (April 10 - May 12, 2010), Installation View. Frank Pictures

Paulin Paris, “Artwareness: Marquetry Paintings,” (April 10 – May 12, 2010), Installation View. Frank Pictures

Paulin Paris, Door "ART" #1, 1, 2010, Contact paper on wood panel, 64 x 40 x 2-5/8 inches

Paulin Paris, Door “ART” #1, 1, 2010, Contact paper on wood panel, 64 x 40 x 2-5/8 inches

Paulin Paris, "Flowers of Life #8, 1, 2010. Digital print and oil on adhesive paper, 11 x 14"

Paulin Paris, “Flowers of Life #8, 1, 2010. Digital print and oil on adhesive paper, 11 x 14”

Paulin Paris, "Puzzle: Words #1,"1 20 x 16", 2009

Paulin Paris, “Puzzle: Words #1,”1 20 x 16”, 2009

JT: Duchamp’s work is important, and of course, Warhol, looking at the everyday object in social commentary.

PP: The difference today, I think, is that when Duchamp did those incredibly new pieces, we could comprehend them conceptually. Today, we see them differently because of the Internet, globalization, computer society, and all that. It becomes real and tangible, and we’re confronted with it. It’s not an idea anymore and I think that has a new credible influence in the art dynamic including the way you relate to art, including the way you present art, including the way you sell art. I think we still have very old ideas about all that. But, we better change because reality is changing faster than our ideas. I have also a local influence, Ed Moses. I met Ed a few years ago and I was lucky to do my first show in LA with him. It was a small show, but it was very important for me, because I think somehow he’s very Californian. That was something so different from all the other influences I could have had. I could understand why it was a good place for me to be in California.

JT: Absolutely.

PP: He has his storage here. He’s not far.

JT: What a great experience.

PP: Yes, it is.

JT: And Olivier, what are your thoughts?

OM: When in France, I was influenced by American photographers. It was my model. Walker Evans––the biggest one, Robert French, Robert Adams, mostly, Lewis Baltz, and then I was lucky because I did a show in France with Lewis Baltz. When I started to photograph, I was trying to copy them but it didn’t work because I was in France. I tried to find my way of copying them but find my own style. When I came here, that was a model, but that’s what I didn’t want to do, because when you are French and go to another country, you can’t do the same thing, you are not American. It’s really important. You have to find a way to capture the place where you are… I mean you’re French. You have a different vision of them. They are a model and an anti-model at the same time so I tried to photograph the same way when I came. It’s so obvious. I’m used to it but when you arrive in America, you have the cars, and you have the roads and it doesn’t work. When you try to photograph this, you can’t do it. You can do it, but it doesn’t work.

JT: Right, but you’re applying your distinct methodology.

OM: Yes, so I tried to find a way to do something else, to show something else. It’s very hard. I think it’s harder to find a way to photograph something when you’re not in your country. You try doing something exotic and it doesn’t work. That’s what most of the French photographers do when they come to America to work for 10 days or three weeks, it doesn’t work.

Olivier Mirguet, "Scrap City," (June 2014)  Installation view. ArtLook Gallery, Los Angeles

Olivier Mirguet, “Scrap City,” (June 2014) Installation view. ArtLook Gallery, Los Angeles

Olivier Mirguet, "Scrap City," (June 2014)  Installation view. ArtLook Gallery, Los Angeles

Olivier Mirguet, “Scrap City,” (June 2014) Installation view. ArtLook Gallery, Los Angeles

Olivier Mirguet, "Untitled," LA Supervision Series, 2006 - 2012. 30 x 15".

Olivier Mirguet, “Untitled,” LA Supervision Series, 2006 – 2012. 30 x 15″.

Olivier Mirguet, "Untitled," LA Supervision Series, 2006 - 2012. 30 x 15".

Olivier Mirguet, “Untitled,” LA Supervision Series, 2006 – 2012. 30 x 15″.

Olivier Mirguet, "Untitled," LA Supervision Series, 2006 - 2012. 30 x 15".

Olivier Mirguet, “Untitled,” LA Supervision Series, 2006 – 2012. 30 x 15″.

Olivier Mirguet, "Untitled," LA Supervision Series, 2006 - 2012. 30 x 15".

Olivier Mirguet, “Untitled,” LA Supervision Series, 2006 – 2012. 30 x 15″.

Olivier Mirguet, "Untitled," LA Supervision Series, 2006 - 2012. 30 x 15".

Olivier Mirguet, “Untitled,” LA Supervision Series, 2006 – 2012. 30 x 15″.

JT: Perhaps other skills might be heightened because of those challenges. We’re glad you’re here and exploring those things as you recognize what those challenges are. And how about you Debra?

DB: I don’t really think of my influences as a particular person or a particular body of work. Right now, it’s more of having the web at your fingertips, is really my influence. I think the idea of being able to be in your studio and be amongst all of the images in the world at the exact same time is probably my biggest influence because my work is so scientifically based, that 70% of my research is done on the web, so, not so much looking at other artists as looking at microscope slides and agricultural landscapes for me.

JT: Excellent. What about you Thinh?

TN: Living in a little village in Vietnam, I didn’t really have any exposure to art. The only exposure to art that I had in Vietnam was this one bohemian painter on the street. He has no arms and only one leg with two toes and he was painting landscapes. At that moment I thought, “If he can do it, I can do it too. I want to be like him.” Being that I was diagnosed with Polio and was basically handicapped, that was my moment of realization. “You can do this.” But of course, I don’t know how to do it as a career; I just knew that was the inspiration. I really don’t think one particular artist influenced me but rather the theoretical and conceptual dialogues behind each historical movement, that’s where I distilled from history. And I incorporate them into my art. As you can tell, the whole combined thing from Marcel Duchamp and Rosenberg that I’m appropriating is there in my work, there is the Feminist theoretical background, as well as the queer theories, all of these theories and concepts is a part of my work. It was kind of funny David Pagel once told me, “You are like the Doctor Frankenstein of concepts. You combine everything together and sew them up.” I thought, “Oh, great, that’s kind of true.” When he said that I began to be interested in literally theories. The word that describes what I’m doing is called, “conceptual blending.” That’s kind of what I feel my practice is. I’m blending a lot of concepts together from past, present, future and what have you, all just mingled together and co-exist in a particular project.

JT: What led you to your study at Claremont?

TN: I always wanted to do art, but was discouraged by my family; who told me “Go into pharmacy… Go into being a doctor, lawyer, blah, blah, blah, blah.” I said, “No, I want to do art.” And of course, I have to make them happy. I actually went into art and education. They said, if I can’t make art as a career, I could be a teacher. And that’s what I did. I got my degree, came out, teach high school, and then realized, Shoot, I do not want to do this. I wanted to be an artist just like that one artist on the street. He has no arms and only one leg with two toes. I want to be like him. I went back to school to get my BFA in Fine Art – came out of undergrad, I tried to get into the art world, tried to sell my work, establish myself, have a studio, and then do the whole art business thing, which I was able to survive doing that, but then realized I need more rigorous and conceptual backing behind my work. And that’s when I decided to drop everything and go back to school. I went to Claremont. It gave me the platform to really think about my work critically and that’s when history, theories, and conceptual ideas really come into place. Then, of course, here I am today.

JT: Yes, theory and practice apply to our everyday art making. Alan, is your organization process linear or non-linear?

AN: It’s both.

JGP: I thought the same thing when you asked Melanie, and then I thought maybe I need better definitions for what would be a linear and non-linear process, because I feel like it’s both.

JT: It’s according to your own context. You can interpret whatever is applicable for your work.

JGP: Yes, I think both.

JT: What about you Paris?

PP: I think for me, art has mostly to do with consciousness and your own awareness of things. Then working on art and realizing that I’m working on a system and that system is actually really big. I see it, I have different method of visualization but it could be seen as a tree. When I work, I take some elements from that tree and connect them with others elements. Then the dynamic from there would liberate and create another branch or something. I think it’s a very dynamic process, but it’s a process where somehow I construct myself in the same time. It’s a conscious process. I really want to see how I transform or bend my vision of things, what can I see and those kinds of questions. I think organization is the key because it’s the discipline, it’s how do you work every day? How do you clean your studio? How do you do all those things that enable you to make the art you do?

JT: Professional acumen and discipline are important. Just getting up in the morning, coming into the studio, doing work whether you feel like it or not, and seeing what happens is part of the process.

PP: Also working on the process, you work on yourself. Working on yourself, you work on the process.

JT: Absolutely.

PP: For me, that is really the key because I think what I love is when people can be engaged when they look at art, as art is a dynamic energy of transformation. That’s the goal.

JT: When people see art, they draw from their own experiences and influences whether from childhood, culturally, historically, economically, or spiritually––whatever informed their lives to that point. In art viewership, people may see the intention of the artist or perceive it in their own way. There are many concepts in visual perception that I find interesting. What about you Olivier?

OM: I don’t know because I don’t make a living of my artwork. I do maybe one piece a year.

JT: Are you linear or non-linear in your organization? When you’re approaching your work do you have a set process or do things evolve organically?

OM: I don’t know how it goes from time to time. I spend three weeks on that project and now it can take three years.

JT: And you Debra?

DB: I was thinking about this. For me, it’s almost like Paris said, it’s sort of the idea of consciousness. I think of it as awake and dreaming. There are points in my studio where I know exactly what I’m trying to get across, there’s research behind it, there’s a lot of sketches. From those sketches whatever proportion they are, I transform the canvas into the exact proportion so my canvases are often strange, strange proportions because they come exactly from the sketch so that’s really linear for me because I want that to be exact. Because I can’t recreate on the canvas, the shear sub-consciousness of what came out of me in the sketchbook. There’s that preciousness versus non-precious thing. In the sketchbook, it’s just sketching and always comes out exactly the way I want and I can never transform that if I just go directly to the canvas. I have to be very orderly in the beginning and get it on the canvas the way I want. Then once it’s on the canvas, I can go back into that sort of dreaming state where I can let things happen.

Debra Bianculli, "Ascorbic Acid," 2014, Acrylic on canvas, 36 x 52"

Debra Bianculli, “Ascorbic Acid,” 2014, Acrylic on canvas, 36 x 52″

Debra Bianculli, "Betacarotene," 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24"

Debra Bianculli, “Betacarotene,” 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24″

Debra Bianculli, "GoldenYum," 2014, Acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24"

Debra Bianculli, “GoldenYum,” 2014, Acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24″

Debra Bianculli, "Ubiquitous," 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 33 x 42"

Debra Bianculli, “Ubiquitous,” 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 33 x 42″

Debra Bianculli, "W.A.I.I.T. (We're All In This Together," 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 30 x 50"

Debra Bianculli, “W.A.I.I.T. (We’re All In This Together,” 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 30 x 50″

JT: Thinh, your thoughts?

TN: I like to think of art as a business and so it’s very structured. Everything has its structure for it to work. Organization is the key for me in my practice. It’s not so linear in terms of my own art making, it’s more of I have an idea and I want to flush out the idea beforehand then into the making, and then the work evolves itself into different ideas, and manifests itself within that process. It’s organically done. But the structure of the business side always has to be right on.

JT: In making these informed decisions, you can allow that stream of consciousness. Do you have a belief system that informs your life and work?

TN: I don’t have any religious belief system per se.

JT: It doesn’t have to be religious.

TN: I think great art has vulnerability and honesty. I like to see that within my work in particular, and in others. Just lay it on the table and be vulnerability to the viewer. To me, that gives you a sense of connection whether it’s with a community or just one person.

JT: It hooks back to the relationship of your work to the culture as well. Debra, do you have a belief system that informs your life or work?

DB: Yes. I’d say I’m really searching for hidden truths. My work is really about illustrating findings that impact everybody that nobody talks about. And so, my belief system really is anti-self and it’s really global.

JT: Excellent. Olivier?

OM: I don’t know. I don’t have a religious belief but the same thing. My own point is to maybe to question the place where I live and try to find a key to understand it. Maybe to find my place also is difficult because as I said, I’m working somewhere else for my living. So I just work. It doesn’t have this special feeling that it brings me when I do my photographs and my installation. The way of walking in the street, trying to find something on ground or to find an idea, so I think that’s it.

PP: Yes. It’s always there because it’s deeply embedded in the structure of my work. I think I see that from a philosophical point of view because I’ve been trained in philosophy. I’m also very interested in the hermetic tradition, which is philosophical, but was under the carpet for millennium. It’s totally available now. And, I’m really interested in the Eastern religions. My grandmother was born in 1902. When she was 50, she was a widow. At that time, she had lost a child, and went to India by herself. She started becoming involved in yoga and she found a guru, I think that had an influence on me, this is coming back now. It’s also hard. I want somehow to relate to these people. I’m trying to touch people on the symbolic level because it’s what interests me. Somehow, I want to go deep in myself and in the people who look at my work. Then it’s why I use for example things that are very mundane sometime because everybody can relate to symbols because we all see symbols. I’m just pulling somehow, not twisting but changing the angle and the light, and then suddenly we look at them we can look at them differently and then we can relate to them. The level of relation it’s only depending on our own vision somehow than it’s always that dynamic things where there was – we create illusion to make us looking into other direction or other illusion and we in that game.

JGP: I wouldn’t say that art is my religion, but I think as humans we have some natural inclination to create and make things. It doesn’t necessarily have to be fine art. So I feel like when I’m creating art, I am participating in this human practice to be creative problem solvers. This is a kind of a deep human connection that I feel I’m participating in. Then in my work specifically, I am very interested in some ancient texts and some rituals. I look at hunting rituals and ceremonial rituals, and a fair amount of things like that.

Jane Gillespie Pryor, "Territory," (solo). Installation view. (October-November 2014), Greenleaf Gallery, Whittier College, Whittier, CA

Jane Gillespie Pryor, “Territory,” (solo). Installation view. (October-November 2014), Greenleaf Gallery, Whittier College, Whittier, CA

Jane Gillespie Pryor, "Territory," (solo). Installation view. (October-November 2014), Greenleaf Gallery, Whittier College, Whittier, CA

Jane Gillespie Pryor, “Territory,” (solo). Installation view. (October-November 2014), Greenleaf Gallery, Whittier College, Whittier, CA

Jane Gillespie Pryor, "Cattle Drive,"  2014. Installation view. Plastic, ceramic, plaster, rabbit fur, 4' x 9' x 3'

Jane Gillespie Pryor, “Cattle Drive,” 2014. Installation view. Plastic, ceramic, plaster, rabbit fur, 4′ x 9′ x 3′

Jane Gillespie Pryor, "Cattle Drive,"  2014. Installation view. Plastic, ceramic, plaster, rabbit fur, 4' x 9' x 3'

Jane Gillespie Pryor, “Cattle Drive,” 2014. Installation view. Plastic, ceramic, plaster, rabbit fur, 4′ x 9′ x 3′

Jane Gillespie Pryor, "Posthumous,"  2014. Installation view. Plastic, 1' x 4' x 3'

Jane Gillespie Pryor, “Posthumous,” 2014. Installation view. Plastic, 1′ x 4′ x 3′

Jane Gillespie Pryor, "Posthumous,"  2014. Installation view. Plastic, 1' x 4' x 3'

Jane Gillespie Pryor, “Posthumous,” 2014. Installation view. Plastic, 1′ x 4′ x 3′

Jane Gillespie Pryor, "Encampment,"  2014. Installation view. Plastic, ceramic, plaster, rabbit fur, 6.5' x 6' x 4'

Jane Gillespie Pryor, “Encampment,” 2014. Installation view. Plastic, ceramic, plaster, rabbit fur, 6.5′ x 6′ x 4′

JT: Alan, what are your thoughts on belief systems?

AN: I have no idea.

JT: Many people have beliefs systems that exist, but they may not be conscious of them.

AN: What are your belief systems?

JT: I look at influences from culture and my upbringing.

AN: What culture?

JT: Contemporary culture that may include media driven technologies, consumerism, environmental issues, ethical concerns––all of these.

AN: These all drive your belief systems?

JT: They inform how I see the world. I was raised a Christian though my mother was Jewish. We later converted to Catholicism. I believe that our belief systems contribute to how we see the world. I think everyone has a belief system. It doesn’t have to be religious or spiritual. It’s what makes them tick, what drives their acumen, their approach, and perspective.

AN: Other than spiritual or religious belief systems, what other belief systems are there?

JT: For example, how you conduct yourself ethically or professionally. How others see you. Values––your conduct as a friend, as a colleague, as family, your commitment to others. This may include the cultural belief systems that you were raised with, the respect you have for your parents, and factors that inform your understanding of self.

AN: Like etiquette?

JT: Etiquette is something that you learn. How you hold a folk, what spoon to use, or how to place your napkin. I’m talking about foundational beliefs and values.

AN: You say that etiquette is not a belief system?

JT: To me, it may be the result of a belief system though it’s a matter of one’s own interpretation.

AN: Everything you’ve mentioned is a result of a belief system. Although you’ve given examples of peripherals or facts, you haven’t told me what your beliefs are.

JT: My belief systems are the influences around me. My spiritual beliefs inform my understanding of the world, and how I react and respond to people and situations.

AN: That’s a very important thing. For instance, etiquette, I heard on the radio recently that party etiquette is to never make your guest feel uncomfortable. That’s deeply rooted in a very communal, keeping the safety of the community together, which is embedded in this sort of tribal kind of thing. So one can say that even pre-religion or spirituality in some philosophical realm that, that simple thing of having a party and how you treat your guest is rooted in something much deeper than religion or spirituality.

JT: Yes, you make a valid point when you put it in that context. I believe that etiquette stems from values.

AN: Like the fork.

JT: Actually, etiquette itself…

AN: That’s just part of it.

JT: …. stemming from the values you acquired as a child.

AN: My favorite one is scissors. Never hand somebody the sharp end of scissors facing towards them. In some cultures, that actually is meaning that you wish death upon them soon. Like in the South or in Africa.

JT: In terms of belief systems––and again, we each have our own understanding of these, they may change. My foundational beliefs inform how I act and respond. I hope to grow in my understanding, as there is always something I can do better. I’m open to honing those belief systems that were ingrained and discover what exists. Thank you for pursuing the question.

AN: Yeah. That was good.

JT: Is quality of work an issue in creation, in viewership, and critical validation? Let’s deconstruct it. Is quality of work an issue in creation?

JGP: Yes.

AN: No.

DB: Who’s the judge?

JGP: You’re the judge. You are, if you are creating it.

JT: Or the viewer or the critic…

DB: That’s the issue.

JT:   Right. That is the issue.

PP:   It depends on when you do it, when you do the work. I mean, I don’t care about quality.

DB: Whatever I make is good enough, that’s how I feel, I’m making it, deal with it! [Laughs]

JT: Is quality of the work an issue in critical validation? If others look at your work, do you think they consider the intent, the creation, methodology, and quality?

JGP: Yes.

PP: Validation is an important element because it would be very difficult to do something completely against all our fears. It would be a tough place. It has to. We all rely on validation, it’s a pending question.

TN: I think it’s a question of emphasis. What is your emphasis in terms of what you’re making. An instructor once told me, “Thinh, you need to use better quality materials.” I said, “Well, I collect detritus to make my art.” So quality of material has nothing to do with the process.

JGP: It doesn’t. It is a different type of quality.

TN: Yes.

JGP: But it influences it. So it’s not high quality but a low quality.

JT: It could be the quality in your articulation or presentation of the process, not the quality of the materials.

TN: That’s why I said, “Where is your emphasis?” in terms of that. I think different people have different ideas in terms of quality. For me it’s the quality of the work and its impact, and the agency it has. Not so much about materiality or the validation of the work per se, but what kind of impact it makes.

JT: Excellent comments. This segues to my next question. What qualifies artist legitimacy or legitimacy in art?

AN: I think the most important thing is consistency. In other words, not just the work but that you are working. Sometimes we all meet people who say, “I’m an artist too, but I haven’t produced anything in 10 years.” But in their mind, they are still an artist. They may even actually propose something, but it’s five-year old work. What did we do five years ago? I don’t think we would propose that, right? I think that’s very, very important.

JGP: Context. Yes. I think it could even be old work, but the question was about legitimacy right?

JT: Right. What qualifies artist legitimacy or legitimacy in art?

JGP: Yes. I think institutions do. I think the public does and popular consensus does. The context of galleries and museums legitimizes work.

JT: What do you think Paris?

PP: I think it’s the way you belong to that social fabric. What is it that you bring that will transform, change things? I’m always amazed by the power of painting and sculpture too. It will change a space, just like that, right away. It will have an influence on people, it will change them… it’s very effective. Then I think our legitimacy comes from that too, it’s the effect we have on our self and around us.

OM: I would say consistency is a good point. I would say, maybe the work, the way you work, everything and also the way people react when they are in front of your work. Not so much, I mean, it’s great to have institutions gathering to see it. I don’t know, I mean, it keeps you going. But I prefer to have a public reaction in front of the audience instead of any other institution or art critique, sorry. Yes, I mean, it’s good, but mostly the work and the public’s vision.

DB: I think it’s a question of when I think about stamina and I think about how long can you maintain your practice over a period of time in the face of the odds. Of course, your practice should change in some capacity, but I think that also validation has a lot to do with it too. Whether you are working completely alone and all that validation has to come from yourself, or you are getting it from the community, they are both equally as beautiful and as valuable.

TN: I think legitimacy is a very, very slow process in the perspective of history. Still, there are artists that are totally so-called un-historicized or un-legitimized in terms of the historical canon or historicizing them. It is a cultural machine that either includes or excludes. I love Judy Chicago’s perspective, “That legitimacy in history is written by those in power.” For me, in some sense, I am against that so I take Judy Chicago’s attitude of inclusiveness. How can I legitimize my own work? And that’s basically, the work that I’m doing without depending on this whole culture system. Or perhaps I play within that culture system and then see how I can transgress it.

JT: We should empower ourselves rather than acquiesce to the powers that be.

TN: Yes. The question I once asked Roland Reiss when he was doing his lectures about his success as an artist at CGU, “How do you see yourself as a successful artist as you’ve been in Documenta and numerous exhibitions?” I find his answer to be very interesting because he said, “When I feel happy with the piece I made, then I’m successful.” So, it could be from a personal to a social, cultural, and even historical perspective. But for me it’s the question of how do we empower ourselves as individual artists? And how do we become participants in the culture and change the very structure of that culture that only continues to legitimize certain kinds of art?

Thinh Nguyen, "Trinity," 2013. Installation view. Discarded paintings and chairs, stretcher bars, threads and yarns, dimension variable

Thinh Nguyen, “Trinity,” 2013. Installation view. Discarded paintings and chairs, stretcher bars, threads and yarns, dimension variable

Thinh Nguyen, "King of The Wall, Queen of The Floor, and Others," 2013. Installation view. Discarded paintings, frames, rope, thread, variable

Thinh Nguyen, “King of The Wall, Queen of The Floor, and Others,” 2013. Installation view. Discarded paintings, frames, rope, thread, variable

Thinh Nguyen, "All American," 2013. Installation view. Discarded paintings, thread and yarn, wooden sticks, dimension variable

Thinh Nguyen, “All American,” 2013. Installation view. Discarded paintings, thread and yarn, wooden sticks, dimension variable

Thinh Nguyen, "Death of Authorship," 2013. Installation view. Discarded paintings and chair, thread and yarn, dimension variable

Thinh Nguyen, “Death of Authorship,” 2013. Installation view. Discarded paintings and chair, thread and yarn, dimension variable

Thinh Nguyen, "Painting For The Visually Impaired," 2013. Installation view. Discarded paintings and stretcher bar, yarn, dimension variable

Thinh Nguyen, “Painting For The Visually Impaired,” 2013. Installation view. Discarded paintings and stretcher bar, yarn, dimension variable

JT: Thank you, Thinh. Let’s discuss art marketing, which is more visible in our culture than ever before with social media and online platforms. There are many approaches used, whether or not you may feel it crosses the line between aesthetic and commodified culture. What have you done to get the word out?

TN: I approach each and every artist here. This is sort of my little pitch… I will always try to cultivate a wider audience for them. Paulin and I had this long conversation about audience. Can a work of art be a work of art without an audience? I think art needs an audience. It doesn’t have to be the so called, “institutional” or “critical audience.” It could be any kind of audience, whether it’s within the community, art enthusiasts, and what have you. Curating this show out of my own studio (thinhstudio), I choose artists that I believe in, and I’m constantly cultivating an audience for their work, as well as for my own work. That’s why I reached out to you. That’s why I reach out to so many media outlets. I also believe that even using the so called, “promotional systems,” what really comes down to it at the end of the day is you have to have good work to cultivate the audience. Having an audience is what makes your work in a sense.

JT: So you can look at it as image awareness, community outreach, and again, broadening the discourse. I asked some of you if you were able to talk to those attending the opening about your work. What can you share?

AN: I’m glad you asked that. This was the first time that I actually had the sound beds autonomous. In the past three times that I’ve presented them, I was performing the music live. I really couldn’t’ talk to any body or they tried to talk to me but it was a very limited conversation. But this time when Thinh gave me the opportunity, and he showed me the room. I said, “It would be great if it just lived by itself and then I could hang out with friends and people,” which is what I did.

JT: It’s good that you had the opportunity to talk about the work and observe the interaction of viewers with your art.

AN: Yes. It was the first time.

JGP: Alan, was it different watching people not performing?

AN: Well, there was a gamut of responses, but I enjoyed seeing people perplexed coming out, like perplexed, saying, “How was that?” My favorite response is always, “Oh, I didn’t know you could experience music like that.” I had one person, not this time, but I think this was at the Red Cat [CalArts], she said something like, “Actually, I didn’t hear this, somebody reported this to me, but it was somewhere in the audience. Someone said, ‘Why the hell didn’t someone tell me earlier that you could experience music like this?’” That was great. I like that.

JT: I’m glad to hear that. Jane, what are your thoughts?

JGP: The opening was great. Thinh did a wonderful job of it. [Applause]

JT: Yes, I saw some of the press. Kudos!

JGP: I have a friend that had a show at a gallery and the gallerist didn’t really speak to her the whole evening, and it was a solo show, and wasn’t introducing her to people. That popped in the back of my head as we were here at the opening, because Thinh did such a wonderful job of, “Here, Jane, meet this artist, and meet this artist.” You were great Thinh. I think this is a welcoming environment where viewers don’t feel intimidated. Of course, that’s not a survey of everything, but I just felt it was really unpretentious and people were really interested in the work and talking to the different artists. I thought it was refreshing.

JT: Paris, your thoughts?

PP: I think it’s always great to see that many people and also, because it’s a special moment to share art. You are showing things that are very personal to people and it’s a very sacred thing. A lot of people just don’t see that. They see the mundane thing, I’m going to get out, see some friends, have a good time, get some drinks. But, it’s more profound because we are sharing something on a very intimate level. I’m really happy when I see people and kids, and all the things that go on, because it’s a way to nourish our symbolic dimension. There is something really deep into that moment of sharing. Yes, it was great. Thanks Thinh for being able to do it.

DB: I concur.

TN: Like I said, the reason why I did this was because I wanted to cultivate a wider audience. A lot of the viewers that come through thinhstudio, are actually non-artists. They are not really a part of the so called art market or the art world, they are just every day working individuals who enjoy or who want to go see art. It’s very unpretentious. They come in, they like the environment and some of them say, “Oh my god, I loved it, it’s so warm and welcoming,” I guess that’s what I hope and trying to do – art is not so intimidating. I have a lot of friends that are not artists, and they said, “No, I’m too afraid to even approach art and look at art because I don’t understand what it’s all about.” Well, that’s why I want to do this–making art more approachable. I believe in the accessibility of art and a lot of institutions prevent it by having this veneer, and not allowing us to have that personal relationship with art. That’s why I’m so glad Jane, Alan, and Melanie did the artist talks to the tour group and they were so happy. They were like, “Wow, we learned so much, you know….”

AN: And they were part of it too.

TN: Of course, Olivier and Paulin, did the talk as well. This one older lady, I loved her so much, she told me, “Oh my god, what the f— is this? It’s way in the f— out of nowhere, but I absolutely love it because when I go to galleries, I can’t talk to anybody.” I said, “Thank you so much, that’s the best compliment I’ve had so far!”

JT: Yes, to make the work approachable. Sometimes we have these misconceptions without knowledge or understanding of what’s going on. Once we gain some insight, we feel a bit more comfortable. At least I do. One reason that I returned to graduate school was to gain a better understanding of these critical issues. What you described is not just happening in LA, it’s happening globally. Being connected with other artists is important. You can videotape the process or event and post it on YouTube, Vimeo, or social media channels as an example.

TN: This is going to happen.

JT: We are all trying to succeed and grow as individuals in our work. It’s looking at what else is out there. I would like to see a global exchange. There may be artists and studios internationally doing exactly what you are doing. Once it’s out there, connections can be made, and collaborations are formed. Being open to that exchange could be very interesting. I want to mention a few marketing strategies that you may or may not have pursued:

  • Targeting your audience with demographics and psychographics
  • Database Development: qualified email and mailing lists
  • Gallery Guides: print and online directories
  • Social Media Integration: Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, Instagram, YouTube, Vimeo
  • Press Releases: print, electronic, and digital media
  • Networking: personal family and friends, professional peers and alliances
  • Search Engine Optimization: html programming keywords in websites, blogs, and online media
  • Multi-media: sharing audio, video, image, and interactive pieces through social media
  • Strategic Partners and Alliances: aligning with other artists, galleries, museums, corporate clients, sponsors, and patrons
  • Art Shows and Art Walks: Coordinating with other artists, galleries, and organizations

TN: Trust me, I did most of them. [Laughs]

JT: Yes, I understand that you have employed much of this, but I share these suggestions for those who have not. For example, acoustic sculptor Michael Brewster has audio and video clips on his website. You can experience the context of his site-specific installations through auditory and visual perception. Search engines find this media as it propagates for better results and rankings.

TN: Just to touch on that, I want to acknowledge Alan who’s an established artist here in LA.

JT: Of course… Alan, you’ve been in your practice for how many years?

AN: About 30 years.

JT: Congrats on your recent accolades.

Alan is a recipient of the California Community Foundation Fellowship for Visual Artists; and City of Los Angeles, (COLA) Individual Artist Fellowship, Department of Cultural Affairs.

TN: It’s such an honor to have Alan here and to support us as a space, as well as other emerging artists.

JT: Thank you for joining us.

TN: Just like you advised, alignment.

AN: This has been great.

JT: You are paving the way. Products can also be a promotional tool.

AN: I have an album.

JT: Yes! Another example is Absolute Vodka. They use artists and cultural figures in their promotional strategy. That might be pushing it. [Laughs]

TN: I’m going to have it soon. [Laughs]

JT: Exactly.

AN: Absolute Thinh. [Laughs]

JT: Again, it’s the context you feel appropriate for the visibility of your work. Though aesthetic and meaning are considered, media is changing, the culture is changing, and so is the message. But the most important thing is to be true to yourself, be mindful, and get your work out.

PP: I think it’s difficult, as we carry the souvenir of what it is to be an artist. But the rules are completely different, as you remind us. If we don’t acknowledge that, we’ll be in trouble because it’s like painting our self with a brush of invisibility.

JT: That’s true.

PP: In the mid-20th Century, the art scene in Europe included probably 500 people and when I say 500, I’m generous. Today, this is the art scene for one community.

JT: The relationships we form in our coteries of art create not only foundations, but lasting ties in our success. Any other comments before we conclude?

TN: Thank you Jill so much for this. We appreciate it.

JT: It was my privilege.

TN: You point out something that’s really important. I told most of the artists, when we do studio visit with them – we create a small niche of community or clique, and you see this very often with exhibition openings around LA or anywhere in the world for that matter, is the same clique that goes from one show to another and their audience is limited within that circle. For me, it’s how do you cultivate audience outside of those circles? That was why I decided, let’s open my studio and do my own thing as an experiment to see what could happen. I feel so far it’s been successful, because I’m able to cultivate people outside of the art world audience in the community who are interested and actually looking for art, and are not afraid to look at it. I approach each and every artist with the question, “Would you be interested in cultivating a wider audience?” We need to cultivate a wider audience.

JT: I think you will find by opening that dialogue, people will to refer you to others, key people in cultural institutions, as I know they already have. Eventually, word trickles down. What you’re doing is exceptional. I enjoyed talking with each of you and wish you continued success. Thank you all.

TN: Thank you so much Jill for sharing. I appreciate it. Thank you Alan, Melanie, Jane, Deborah, Paulin, and Olivier for being here also.

Artists: Thank you.

[End of transcript]

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Artists l-r: Jane Gillespie Pryor, Jill Thayer, Alan Nakagawa, Thinh, and Paulin Paris, Hawthone, CA, 2014.

The audio recording and narrative transcript is in the public domain and may be used without permission. Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview at thinhstudio by Jill Thayer, Ph.D., 2014 June 12. Photographs courtesy of thinhstudio, the Artists, and Jill Thayer, Ph.D., are copyright protected and require expressed permission by the contributors for use. Other photographs and art images are copyright protected and may be used without permission, and cited as follows: [Image title] ©2014 [Artist or Photographer]; Oral history interview at thinhstudio by Jill Thayer, Ph.D., 2014 June 12, Los Angeles, California. • http://www.jillthayer.wordpress.comhttp://www.artnarratives.wordpress.com.

Jill Thayer, Ph.D. is an artist, educator, and curatorial archivist. She is Associate Professor of Art History for Allan Hancock College, Santa Maria, California; and online faculty at Santa Monica College in Art History: Global Visual Culture; Southern New Hampshire University in  Humanities/Art History and Marketing; and Post University in the MBA Marketing program for the Malcolm Baldrige School of Business. Jill is contributing writer for Artvoices Magazine, Los Angeles; and Artpulse Magazine, Miami. Her postdoctoral project, “In Their Own Words: Oral Histories of CGU Art,” featuring Professors Emeritus, Professors, and Alumni of Claremont Graduate University is included in Archives of American Art at The Smithsonian Institution.

_________________________

Artist CV/Resume:

THINH NGUYEN

DEBRA BIANCULLI

OLIVIER MIRGUET

MELANIE MOORE

ALAN NAKAGAWA

PAULIN PARIS

JANE GILLESPIE PRYOR

____________________

THINH NGUYEN

714-345-5086

info@thinhstudio.com

http://www.thinhstudio.com

 

EDUCATION

2011     MFA, Interdisciplinary Art and Social Practice, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont

2007     BFA, Drawing and Painting, California State University, Fullerton

2007     BA, Art Education, Accredited, California State University, Fullerton

SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2015     Composite: American Born, Greenleaf Art Gallery, Whittier College, Whittier (forthcoming)

2012     Untitled (search, collect, paint), Marymount College Art Gallery, San Pedro

2011     Of Bound and Balls, East Gallery, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont

2010     Canvassing Peace, American Friends Association Gallery, Los Angeles

2009     Anyone Can Be An Artist, LA Annex Collective, Downtown Los Angeles

2008     My Land, Spring Art Collective Gallery, Los Angeles

2007     A Bright New Day, Chi Phoenix Association Gallery, Los Angeles

2006     An Intimate World, Cal Sate Fullerton Exit Gallery, Fullerton

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2014     Biomythography: Secret Poetry and Hidden Angers, Claremont Graduated University Galleries, Claremont

Olly Olly Oxen Free, Offramp Gallery, Pasadena

Rave and Rave #2, Le Couac, Villeurbanne, France

LA n CV, Coachella Valley Art Center, Coachella Valley, Indio

Bodies, Northern Seattle Community College Art Gallery, Seattle, WA

2013     Holleweenie, Los Angeles Theatre, Los Angeles in collaboration with Yoshie Sakai

Momentum, Pop-up exhibition at West Hollywood Park, West Hollywood

Install: WeHo “Good Queer”, Pop-up exhibition at El Toval Lot, West Hollywood

2012     Un-Space Ground, College Art Association Symposium and Exhibition, Los Angeles Convention Center curated by Deborah Oliver: Irrational Exhibits and Ed Woodman: AiOP

Voyeur: Repositioning the Gaze, Truman State University Art Gallery, MO

curated Brandelyn Dillaway 2012 Curatorial Fellow

So-Cal Pacific Asian Artists, Gallery Rheeway, Los Angeles

2011     Mix-Media Show, Coastline Community College Gallery, Huntington Beach

Irrational Exhibits 8, Track 16, Bergamot Station, Santa Monica curated by Deborah Oliver

VEX Again, dA Center for The Arts, Pomona

Emergent 12, Object Gallery, Claremont

2010     Traces, Peggy Phelps/East Gallery, Claremont Graduate University

MUC presents “A Video Show”, Mandrake, Culver City, Los Angeles

Revisiting Beauty, Orange County Center for Contemporary Art, Santa Ana

2009     Without: Themed Biennial, UCLA New Wight Gallery, Los Angeles

For Love or Money, The Brea Art Gallery, City of Brea

LA to OC: Extreme, Orange County Center for Contemporary Art, Santa Ana

2008     California Visual Artists, 2nd City Council Gallery, Long Beach

Unfolding Nature, The Grind Gallery, Mar Vista

Guest Artist: Internal Landscapes, Spring Art Collective Gallery, Los Angeles

A Night of Art, Barnsdall Gallery Theatre, Hollywood

Abstraction, Koo’s Art Center, Long Beach

2007     Member Show, 2nd City Council Gallery, Long Beach

ArtCast Show, Cal State Fullerton Exit Gallery, Fullerton

Feature Artists: Internal Landscapes, Mountain Bar, Los Angeles

 2006     SCURR, Occidental Collage, Los Angeles

SELECTED PERFORMANCES AND INTERVENTIONS

2013     LA Road Concert, Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles

2012     AiOP: MODEL, 14th Street, Manhattan, NY

Artist Anonymous, Museum of Modern New York, NY

Artist Anonymous, New Museum, Bowery, NY

Silent IS Golden, USSSA performance rally, Pershing Square Park Los Angeles

2011     Third Strike: 100 Performances in a Hole, SOMArt Cultural Art Center, San Francisco

Artist Anonymous, Los Angeles Contemporary Museum of Art, Los Angeles

Geishas Walking, Glow Festival, Santa Monica

Artist Anonymous, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

2010     Artist Anonymous, Caldwell Gallery, Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena

Side Walk, Downtown LA Artwalk, Los Angeles

Artist Anonymous, San Francisco Museum of Modern Arts, San Francisco

About Town, Downtown San Francisco, Starbucks, Macy Mall, San Francisco

2009     Silenced, Claremont Graduate University, Los Angeles

Geishas Walking: Downtown LA Artwalk, Deborah Martin Gallery, Los Angeles

LECTURES AND SEMINARS

2012     Artist Talk, United Society of Subversive Artists Convergence, Pasadena

Artist Talk, United Society of Subversive Artists Convergence, San Francisco

2011     Artist Talk, University of California Santa Barbra, Santa Barbra

Artist Talk, Marymount College, Palos Verdes

Critical Art Theory Seminar and Discussion Group, Claremont Graduate University

2010     Professional Artistic Development Seminar, Claremont Graduate University

2009     Intuitive Art Seminar and Workshop, Studio 528, Downtown Los Angeles

2008     Artist Talk, Orange Coast Community College, Costa Mesa

AWARDS AND HONORS

2013     Halloweenie Exhibition Fund, Gay Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles Non-profit Organization

Momentum Exhibition Fund, One City One Pride Art Festival, City of West Hollywood

INSTALL: WeHo “Good Queer” Exhibition Fund, City of West Hollywood

2012     INSTALL: WeHo Exhibition Fund, Pasadena Art City Council and City of West Hollywood, Sponsor by Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibits and ONE Archive Gallery and Museum

2011     Walker/Parker Memorial Fellowship, Claremont Graduate University

2010     Fernandez Prize in Art, Claremont Graduate University

2010     Claremont Graduate University Art Fellowship

BIBIOGRAPHY

2014     Feature: Thinh’s Limelight Art Exhibit, Forth Magazine

http://www.forthmagazine.com/events/2014/07/feature-thinhs-limelight-art-exhibit/

Illuminted From Above Hawthorne’s Cordary Avenue Glowing With Artists, Easy Reader News

http://www.easyreadernews.com/84416/illuminated-hawthornes-cordary-avenue-glows-artists/

Burried Treasure: An Artist’s Enclave In Hawthorne Rises to The Surface, Easy Reader News

http://www.easyreadernews.com/81105/buried-treasure-artists-enclave-hawthorne-rises-surface/

2013     Atomic Bombs and Shotgun Shell Trees: Hawthorne Has an Art Scene, Los Angeles Magazine

http://www.lamag.com/laculture/culturefilesblog/2013/12/05/atomic-bombs-and-shotgun-shell-treeshawthorne-has-an-art-scene

Halloweenie 2013 to Benefit Gay Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles’ Alive Music Project, Huffington Post, Oct. 10, 3:55 PM http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jason-mannino/

Emerging Artist Selection 2013: Thinh Nguyen, be-Art Magazine, Jan. 30

http://www.beartmagazine.com/emerging-selection-2013-thin-nguyen/

2012     Art in Odd Places: MODEL, exhibition catalogue, New York

Voyeur: Repositioning The Gaze, exhibition catalogue, Truman State University Exhibition

Visual and Performance Art in Unexpected Public Places, Art in Odd Places: Los Angeles

http://www.artinoddplaces.org/artists/nguyen-thinh/

2011     New Gallery on the San Pedro Art Scene, Grand Central Newsletter of San Pedro

http://sanpedrocity.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Grand-Central-05-final-web.pdf

INSTALL: WeHo Exhibition Announcement, One Archives Gallery & Museum

http://www.onearchives.org/installweho/

Video Capsule Irrational Exhibit 8, Irrational Exhibits, Apr. 16

http://irrationalexhibits.com/blog/portfolio/irrational-exhibits-8/#1

2010     Objective Affection, Claremont Graduate University Publication

Revisiting Beauty, exhibition catalogue, Orange County Contemporary Center of Art

2009     Without Biennial, exhibition catalogue, University of California, Los Angeles Catalogue

LA2OC: Emphasis Extreme, exhibition catalogue, Orange County Contemporary Center of Art

2008     Simple Outstanding, District Magazine, Long Beach, July 2008

Artist Resources, Vietnamese American Arts and Letters Association, Jan. 2008

http://www.vaala.org/thinh-nguyen.html

____________________

DEBRA BIANCULLI

d.bianculli@gmail.com

http://www.debrastudio.com

 

Education

2011   M.F.A. Studio Arts, California State University Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
2004   B.F.A. Syracuse University, College of Visual and Performing Arts, Syracuse, NY

Selected Exhibitions

2014   Recent Paintings, Mitchabrim Community Center, Los Angeles, CA
           Limelight, Thinh Studio, Hawthorne, CA
           One For The Road, Hudson|Linc, Los Angeles, CA

2013   Margin Release Right, West LA College Art Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
True Blue, Sangria Fine Arts, Lake Balboa, CA

2012   Metabolize, Market Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
Sex and Candy, Sangria Fine Arts, Lake Balboa, CA

2011   C.A.N.D.I.E.D., MFA Show, FA Gallery, Cal State University, Los Angeles, CA
Ready Made Color, 
Luckman Fine Arts Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

2010   Felipe Ehrenberg Retrospective, Collaborative Mural, MOLA, Long Beach, CA

2009   Red Rover, NightHawks LA at Bedrock Studios, Los Angeles, CA

2008   The Canvas Project, Art House Coop, Atlanta, GA
          Naughty! Naughty! Wabi-Sabi!, The Hive Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

2007   Small Wonders, Pharmaka Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. Curated by Holly Myers
          Faculty Biennial Exhibition. Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA

2006   Autumn Annual Juried Show, WAG GalleryWorcester, MA, Curated by Nato Thompson
          Smile: An American Icon, Worcester Historical Museum, MA

Curated Exhibitions

2012   Metabolize, Market Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

____________________

OLIVIER MIRGUET

033 7 82 69 20 54

mirguetolivier@yahoo.fr

ww.agencevu.com/photographers/photographer.php?id=113

 

Olivier Mirguet was born in 1972. He is a photographer and lives in Paris and Los Angeles. His current work explores places that represent power and surveillance. A series devoted to North Korea in 2002 is the starting point of his project. It was awarded with the World Press Photo Prize in 2003. Seeing without being seen is the idea he proceeds in Los Angeles. His new work continues to explore surveillance: cameras, cropped paparazzi’s pictures, and vision of Los Angeles through the searchlight of police helicopters. Mirguet is represented by Agence Vu in Paris since 2003.

Exhibitions

– “Paparazzi ! “, Centre Pompidou Metz, France. February-april 2014. Curator : Clément Chéroux (Chief Conservator Centre Pompidou Paris), Quentin Bajac ((Chief Conservator Moma New York), Sam Stourdzé (director Musée de l’Elysée, Lausanne)

– “Paparazzi ! “, Schim Kunsthalle Francfort, Allemagne. June-october 2014

– “Scrap City”, ArtLook Gallery, Los Angeles. June 2014

– “Supervision LA”, Lacen Gallery, Los Angeles, USA. May 2013

-” In the night “, Photobiennale Moscow, Russia. April 2010

– “Chopers”, Images Singulières, Sète, France. June 2011

-” SupervisionL.A. “, 7th international Biennial Photography and visual arts, Liège, Belgique, march 2010

-” SupervisionL.A.”, Galerie du Château d’Eau, Toulouse, France. Février – march 2009

-“Identités photographiques Européennes”, Nuit Blanche, Paris, Octobre 2008. Curator Quentin Bajac (Conservateur en chef Moma New York)

-” Nuit de l’Europe “,  Rencontres d’Arles 9 juillet 2008. France. Commissariat de Quentin Bajac ((Chief Conservator Moma New York)

-” SupervisionL.A. “, Biennale Art Grandeur Nature, Seine Saint Denis, France. September– november 2008

-“Transphotographia”, Photographic Festival, Gdansk, Poland. August-September 2007

-” 17h16 “, Maison Européenne de la Photographie (MEP), Paris, France. February 2005.

-” North Korea, another journey “,Tri Postal de Lille, France. Festival Transphotographiques, may 2005.

Awards and Collections

-World Press Photo 2003 for  « North Korea». 2nd prize general news stories.

-Public Collections : Fonds National d’Art Contemporain (Fnac), Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Drac Seine Saint Denis.

-Private Collections : Galerie Juana de Aizpuru, Madrid. François Moret, Los Angeles.

Books

-“Supervision LA”, Editions du Château d’Eau, mars 2009

-“Photo Graphisme”, Amaniman editor, 2006

-“Photo Poche VU”, Actes Sud editor, 2006

-“17h16 “, Editions Khiasma, novembre 2005

-” Sarava”, Editions Naïve/Actes Sud, octobre 2005

TV

-Filmmaker, DP, editor “Personne Ne Bouge”, Arte, since november 2011. Stories on litterature, cinema, music, photography. 10′ length

-Filmmaker, DP, editor “Arte Info” , “Arte Culture”, Arte, since september 2009. Los Angeles. 2’30 length

-DP “Tracks”, Arte, since may 2013.

-Filmmaker, DP, editor, monteur, RTBF since september 2009.

-Filmmaker, DP, editorr  “Global Mag”, Arte. Aprill 2011-April 2012. Los Angeles. 11′ length

-Filmmaker, DP, editor (Avid/Final Cut) “Métropolis”, Arte, 2007-2011. Stories on litterature, cinema, music, photography. 10′ length

Documentaries

-DP “Philarmonique of Jean Nouvel”, 52′ in production. Arte – Electron Libre. October 2014

-DP, “Movie Couples, 2 x 52′, Orange TV – Adamis. May 2014

-DP “Inside Out, an homosexuality story”,52′, Arte-Agat Films June 2014

-DP “From stars to president”, 93′, Direct 8. March 2014

-DP “Off the Grid”, 52′, Enquête Exclusive M6. January 2014

-DP  “Series Addicts” (Canal Plus-Agat Films) and “Cheerleaders, an american myth” (Arte-Agat Films). January 2011

-DP  “T-Shirt stories” (Arte-Agat Films). 2009

____________________

MELANIE MOORE

619.208.5139

melmoore81@gmail.com

http://www.mooremelanie.com

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/melanie.moore.7399

Google+ – https://plus.google.com/u/0/+MelanieMoore0421/posts

 

Education

2011     Masters In Fine Arts, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA

2010     Armory Fellowship and Artist Teaching Program, Armory for the Arts, Pasadena, CA

2003     BA Studio Art, Honors Program University of California, Irvine, CA

Solo & Two Person Exhibitions

2012     “The Unbearable Lightness of Form”, Autonomie, Los Angeles, CA

2011     “Selecting In – Selecting Out”, MFA Thesis Exhibition, East Gallery, Claremont

Graduate University, CA

Selected Group Exhibitions

2014     “Lime Light”, thinhstudio, Hawthorne, CA

2012     “The New Cool School”, White Box Contemporary, San Diego, CA

2012     “Medicine Chest” Lux Art Space, Sunland, CA

2011     “La Cosa Nostra”, Rheeway Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

2011     “Speculative Materialism II” Andi Compognone Projects, Pomona, CA

2011     “Habits of Mind: Armory Fellows Show” Waterworks Building at Colorado One, Pasadena, CA

2011     “Ascend” Ann 330 Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

2011     “MFA Graduating Class” Claremont Graduate Galleries, Claremont, CA

2011     “12 Emergent” Objct Gallery, Claremont, CA

2010     “Traces” Group Installation Show, Claremont Graduate Galleries, Claremont, CA

2010     “Second Year MFA Group Exhibition” Claremont Graduate Galleries, Claremont, CA

2010     “Spaces in Between” Site Specific Installation Group Show, Burkle Building, Claremont, CA

2009     “Exhibit A” Claremont Graduate University First Year Show, Claremont Graduate

Galleries, Claremont, CA

Artist Talks

2011     “Ascend”, LACMA MUSE Gallery Tour Artist Talk, Ann 330 Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

2011     “Dressed in Manner and Sullied by Form” Panel Artist Talk, 12th Annual CGU Student

Research Conference & Art Exhibition, Claremont, CA

2010     “Spaces in Between” Claremont Graduate University, Panel Artist Talk,

Burkle Building, Claremont, CA

Awards

2011     Transdisciplinary Working Group Award “Integration of Education, Art and Science”,

Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA

____________________

ALAN NAKAGAWA, Sound art

1151 5th Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90019-3439

323-821-2127, cafelala@yahoo.com

http://www.collagecollage.com

 

Alan Nakagawa has worked primarily in sound and has been creating audience participatory sound experiences for the past decade. Drawing from diverse influences such as the Integratron Sound Bath in Joshua Tree, CA, the frequency cluster studies of 1930’s scientist Royal Rife, personal family immigration experiences, architectural history, earthworks or his fascination with ultra-sonic communication of bats and marine mammal, Nakagawa has created a repertoire of installations and sound works that breakdown and then expand our understanding of listening and invisible form. His primary sound sources are field recordings, analog effects boxes, oscillators, and his invention the Iso Cube, which is a mini-isolation box that houses objects and allows him to processes odd textures and pseudo- rhythms using micro percussion, which he loops and builds into what he terms as “thick chords.”

In 2013, Nakagawa was awarded a Cultural Exchange International Grant through the City of Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department, which allowed him to participate in an Artist in Residency program at the University of Barcelona. Through the University, he was granted permission by the Sagrada Familia, which was designed by Antoni Gaudi, to be the first artist to conduct a field recording of the interior space at floor level, 15 meters and 30 meters with a three point recording design. Along with field recordings taken at Watts Towers in Los Angeles and other unique architectural works, Nakagawa is working on a vibratory sound installation that is inspired by the concept of omnipresence. Nakagawa has presented his work at such venues as the ohernhoch/Berlin Germany, NIU Space/Barcelona Spain, La Panaderia/Mexico City, Oogimachi Museum Square/Osaka Japan, and throughout Southern California; Museum of Contemporary Art/Los Angeles, Soundwalk/Long Beach, CA, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, East LA REP, the.wulf, Highways, REDCAT, Japanese American National Museum and the Getty Center. Nakagawa is a recipient of the 2012 California Community Foundation Mid-Career Fellowship. He has been featured on KCET TV’s Artbound program. He holds a Bachelors of Fine Arts from Otis Art Institute, a Masters of Fine Arts from the University of California Irvine and is a Monbusho (Ministry of Culture and Education, Japan) Scholar. He has received training through the University of California Los Angeles Oral History Program. He has lectured at various universities and non profits; curates the weekly experimental music webcast Ear Meal; co-founded and directed Collage Ensemble Inc., managed mural projects for the Social and Public Art Resource Center and is currently a Senior Public Arts Officer for the LA Metro.

SOUND ART

2014     AUDIO FIELD REPORT, 2 weekend installation, ohernhoch – der Geräuschladen, Berlin, Germany

2014     ORGAN OF CORTI PART 2 (Homage to Nancy Holt), Lime Light, Cordary Arts, Hawthorne, CA

2014     CONICAL SOUND TEST #1, REVERB, Torrance Art Museum, CA

2013     SAGRADA FAMILIA Field Recording, University of Barcelona

2013     MOONDOG POLE, Soundwalk 2013, Long Beach, CA

2012     FIRST IN SPACE; THE RIDE, with Joseph Tepperman, Soundwalk 2012, Long Beach, CA

2011     SOUND FOREST, percussion installation, CicLAvia 2011, Los Angeles, CA

2011     COOL, 2 hour sound loop for the Coolhaus Ice Cream Truck, Soundwalk, Long Beach, CA

2010     SOUND BED, mobile sound sculpture, Soundwalk 2010, Long Beach, CA

2009     SOUND TAXI, Otonomiyaki, 2009 Soundwalk, Long Beach, CA

2009     POTA POTA, Otonomiyaki, sound installation, Glendale Arizona Jazz and Blues Festival

2008     OTONOMIYAKI, art installation, Eagle Rock Art Center, CA

2008     GINGER & MARYANN, Soundwalk, Long Beach, CA

2007     IN TENTS, video and sound installation, with Mona Kasra at Highways, Santa Monica, CA

PERFORMANCES

2013     ALAN&EVA, w/Evitzkaya PJ, NIU Espai Artistic Contemporay, Barcelona Spain

2013     ORGAN OF CORTI (Premier), East LA REP, Los Angeles, CA

2013     ISO CUBE IMPROVISATION, Deluxe Burrito/Shangrila, Joshua Tree, CA

2013     ORGAN OF CORTI (excerpt), Studio Spring 2013, Redcat, LA, CA

2013     ORGAN OF CORTI (excerpt), Alexis Disselkoen studio class, University of Southern California

2012     EAR DIORAMA EAR, Iso Cube and electronics, Eternal Telethon, Side Street Projects, Pasadena, CA

2012     1 IMAGE 1 MINUTE, group recitation, X-TRA 15th Anniversary, ForYourArt, LA, CA

2012     ROYAL PAIN 3.0, solo electronic music and video performance, Ear Meal webcast

2012     EAR DIORAMA EAR, Iso Cube and electronics, Lost Coast Culture Machine, Fort Bragg, CA

2012     EAR DIORAMA EAR, Iso Cube and electronics, Luggage Store, San Francisco, CA

2012     RICHARD WOOD & FRIENDS, Iso Cube and electronics, 322 Club, Sierra Madre, CA

2012     SASAKI, pop corn, stove, oscillators, effects, FUKUSHIMA memorial curated by Mari, the wulf. LA, CA

2012     RICHARD WOOD & FRIENDS, Iso Cube and electronics, Muddy Waters Café, Santa Barbara, CA

2011     SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SOUNDSCAPE ENSEMBLE, Ear Meal webcast, http://www.laartstream.com

2011     SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SOUNDSCAPE ENSEMBLE, Fingerprints, Soundwalk, Long Beach, CA

2011     SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SOUNDSCAPE ENSEMBLE, Open, Long Beach, CA

2011     ETERNAL TELETHON, Iso Cube solo, Belly Flop, Echo Park, CA

2011     Ear Diorama Ear, Ear Meal webcast, http://www.laartstream.com

2011     International Listening Day, Southern California Soundscape Ensemble, Open, Long Beach, CA

2011     William Leavitt Exhibition, Iso Cube solo, the wulf @ Sunday, MOCA, LA, CA

2011     BIG FAMILY DAY, What’s In The Box, William Leavitt Exhibition, the wulf @ MOCA, LA, CA

2011     NEIGHBORHOOD PUBLIC RADIO, Fuzztone Drone; 100 guitarists, MOCA, LA CA

2011     SOUTHERN CA SOUNDSCAPE ENSEMBLE, Open, Long Beach, CA

2011     SOUTHERN CA SOUNDSCAPE ENSEMBLE, Resbox, Steve Allen Theater, Hollywood, CA

2011     EAR DIORAMA EAR, Alan Nakagawa and Kaoru Monsour, and Liam Mooney, Studio 5216, LA, CA

2011     RED FLAT, Omayumi, Steven M Irvin, Alan Nakagawa, Ear Meal webcast, http://www.laartstream.com

2011     RED FLAT, Omayumi, Steven M Irvin, Alan Nakagawa, Integratron, Joshua Tree, CA

2011     RED FLAT, Omayumi, Steven M Irvin, Alan Nakagawa, Japanese American National Museum, LA, CA

2011     RED FLAT, Omayumi, Steven M Irvin, Alan Nakagawa, Mesa College, San Diego, CA

2011     RED FLAT, Omayumi, Steven M Irvin, Alan Nakagawa, the wulf, LA, CA

2010     EAR DIORAMA EAR, Alan Nakagawa and Kaoru Monsour, Ear Meal Webcast, http://www.laartstream.com

2010     EAR DIORAMA EAR, Alan Nakagawa and Kaoru Monsour, Porter Gallery, Long Beach, CA

2010     EAR DIORAMA EAR, Alan Nakagawa and Kaoru Monsour, Ear Meal Webcast

2010     ANNA HOMLER with Jorge Martin and Alan Nakagawa, Ear Meal Webcast

,2010    ALAN NAKAGAWA with Steven M. Irvin and Jeffrey Mohr on Ear Meal Webcast, http://www.laartstream.com

2010     DEPARTMENT OF REAL ESTATE, Kio Griffith, Peter Watkinson, Alan Nakagawa, Ear Meal Webcast

2010     DWIGHT TRIBLE with Alan Nakagawa on Ear Meal Webcast, http://www.laartstream.com

2010     DREW LESSO with Peter Watkinson and Alan Nakagawa, Ear Meal Webcast, http://www.laartstream.com

2020     ALICIA VOGL SAENZ,Peter Watkinson and Alan Nakagawa, Ear Meal Webcast, http://www.laartstream.com

2010     DREW LESSO, JORGE MARTIN, PETER WATKINSON, ALAN NAKAGAWA, Porter Gallery, Long Beach, CA

2010     SCRATCH MUSIC, performer, SASSAS, Fiesta Hall, West Hollywood, CA

2010     EAR MEAL, director/performer, Collage Ensemble Inc., weekly webcast, http://www.laartstream.com

2010     NAKAGAWA & ORPILLA, sound performance, Automat, Chinatown, LA, CA

2010     DEPARTMENT OF REAL ESTATE, drummer, Pharoah’s Den, Riverside, CA

2009     LIVE@LUNCH, Nakagawa and Drew Lesso, Online performance, 10/09/09

2009     SOUND TAXI, Otonomiyaki, Soundwalk, Long Beach, CA

2009     DEPARTMENT OF REAL ESTATE, Various Performances, LA County

2009     POTA POTA, Otonomiyaki, sound installation, Glendale Arizona Jazz and Blues Festival

2009     Various Performances. Department of Real Estate, drums/composer, Los Angeles, CA

2008     FOUNDSOUND, Guest Composer, sound collaborations with Otonomiyaki (Kio Griffith), Steve Roden, Steven M. Irvin, Mona Kasra (Collage Ensemble Inc.), Mike the Poet & Mary Tyler Smores; solo performance by Joseph Hammer, 3-day public opening of BCAM at LACMA, LA, CA

2008     Various Performances, Department of Real Estate, drums/composer, Los Angeles, CA

2007     FINGERED SEVEN, co-produced by Collage Ensemble Inc and EZTV, video/performance

collaborations, Nakagawa and Mona Kasra installation, Highways, Santa Monica, CA

2007     Various Performances, Mary Tyler Smores, art rock band, drummer, Southern, CA

2007     Various Performances, Pink Lips 69, drummer, Japanese power rock 80’s band, Southern CA

2006     SOUNDSCAPES AND URBAN BEATS, Alan Nakagawa, AM Projects, LA, CA

2006     AMINO ACID MICRO OPEARS, Collage Ensemble Inc18th Street Arts Complex, Santa Monica, CA

2006     Interdisciplinary Workshop, CalState Northridge, Northridge, CA

2005     Interdisciplinary Workshop, CalState Northridge, Northridge, CA

2004     Soundwalk, Installation, Flood, Long Beach, CA

2004     Simply Songwriting Music Festival, Producer, St. Elmo Village, LA, CA

2004     2%, drummer, post punk music group, various venues throughout Southern California

2003     CAFFEINE TOUR, musician and songwriter, six venues in Southern California

2003     MONKEY PETE, drummer, puppet theater, various venues

2003     FURUTANI JAZZ, drummer, various evenings, Coffee Cartel, Redondo Beach, CA

2003     UTOPIA POP POP, musician, producer with puppet groups, Collage Ensemble, MOCA, LA, CA

2003     UTOPIA POP POP, musician, producer/puppet groups, Collage Ensemble, LA, CA

2003     LA URBAN FOLK, musician, OG3 Records, Highland Ground, Hollywood, CA

2002     RAICES DIGITAL MACRO OPERA, six short works composition for the Internet, Project was a collaborative between the artist, artists, Officers from the INS and immigrants to the US, Collage Ensemble Inc., http://www.pacce.com

2002     XIMOS, drummer, recording, Glenn Kaino/ Press Play, West Hollywood, CA

2002     LA URBAN FOLK, musician, CD Release, OG3 Records, Highland Ground, Hollywood, CA

2002     MONKEY PETE, drummer, puppet theater, various venues

2002     FURUTANI JAZZ, drummer, various evenings, Coffee Cartel, Redondo Beach, CA

2001     SUITE SIXTEEN, multi-media performance works, Collage Ensemble, Santa Fe Arts Colony, LA, CA

2000     THE HILO SUITES, concert of sound works about Hilo Hawaii, Takoyaki Gen LA, CA

2000     LA URBAN FOLK, concert of original folk songs about LA, Takoyaki Gen, LA, CA

1999     RED WOMAN, with Mayumi Hamada Open Air Play Festival, Kobe, Japan

1999     TRAVEL, Oogimachi Museum Square, Osaka, Japan

1999     SPRING, with Maymui Hamada, Oogimachi Museum Square, Osaka, Japan

1998     UN(TITLED), Collage Ensemble Inc., Friday Night at the Getty, Getty Center, Los Angeles

1998     HARVEST BUNNY, Collage Ensemble, All You Can Eat Exhibition, Upstairs at the Market Gallery, LA, CA

1998     POETRY AND SOUND Nakagawa, Vogl-Saenz and Archila, CM Bookshop, Silverlake, CA

1996     MOTHER’S DAY, Collage Ensemble Inc., Light Bringer’s Project, W Hollywood Homeless Organization at the House of Blues, Hollywood

1996     MICROWAVEABLE SOUL MICRO OPERA, Collage Ensemble Inc., La Panaderia, two performances, Mexico City, Mexico

1995     EARTHQUAKE WITHIN, with Mayumi Hamada and Collage Ensemble Inc., Japanese American National Museum, Los Angeles, CA

1995     AMERICAN AUDIO POSTCARD, Collage Ensemble Inc., L.A. Artcore, L.A. CA

1995     ELECTRONIC SEANCE, Collage Ensemble Inc., Highways, Santa Monica, CA

1995     ELECTRONIC SEANCE PART TWO, Collage Ensemble Inc., Minoya Hall, Osaka, Japan

1995     ELECTRONIC SEANCE PART ONE, Collage Ensemble Inc., Ishinji Theatre, Osaka, Japan

1994     ELECTRONIC SEANCE, Collage Ensemble Inc., Arroyo Bookstore, LA, CA

1994     ELECTRONIC SEANCE, Collage Ensemble Inc., LA Arts Festival, Leimert Park, LA, CA

1993     ELECTRONIC SEANCE, Collage Ensemble Inc., EZTV, West Hollywood, CA

1993     ELECTRONIC SEANCE, Collage Ensemble Inc., Galaxy Theater, Hollywood, CA

1992     CAFE COLLAGE, Collage Ensemble Inc., System M, Long Beach, CA

1991     CAFE COLLAGE, Collage Ensemble Inc., System M, Long Beach, CA

1990     CAFE COLLAGE, Collage Ensemble Inc., SPARC, Venice CA

1988     KODOMO MICRO OPERA, Collage Ensemble Inc., Japan America Theater, LA, CA

1988     KODOMO MICRO OPERA, Collage Ensemble Inc., University of California, Irvine

1987     KODOMO MICRO OPERA, Collage Ensemble Inc., Fringe Festival, Japanese American Cultural and Community Center, LA, CA

1986     RIME Dance Theater, Guest Composer, Occidental College, LA, CA

1986     EXERCISES IN BREATHING, Collage Ensemble Inc., Galleria Ocasco, Silver Lake, CA

1985     ACT OF RESPONDING, Collage Ensemble Inc., Park Plaza Hotel, LA, CA

SOUNDTRACKS

2014     TENNIS, video documentary, Joan Ruiz, Barcelona, Spain

2011     Ear Diorama Ear, EDE, First CD

2011     CLOSURE, solo, CD

2010     Department of Real Estate, drummer, Second CD

2008     Department of Real Estate, drummer, First CD

2008     FURBOWL, Otonomiyaki with Kio Griffith

2004     2% Demo, post punk band, recording producer, drummer

2004     MEAT COLLECTIVE, sound for website, http://www.meatcollective.com

2003     SNOW, Joji Okazaki, Smoggy Mountain, animation short, http://www.loungego.com

2003     2%, Drummer, original Indies/ Punk band, various shows throughout Southern California

2003     INSTALLATIONS, Yong Soon Min and Allan de Souza, various national and international venues

2003     MONKEY PETE, theme music for video and various live shows in Los Angeles, http://www.monkeypete.com

2002     LA URBAN FOLK, eighteen original songs and instrumentals written and performed by Nakagawa. Guest musicians include Michael Whitmore, Debbie Sato, and Brandy Maya Healy. Audio compact disc, distributed by OG3 Records.

2002     MONKEY PETE, theme music for video and various live shows in Los Angeles, http://www.monkeypete.com

2001     SUITE SIXTEEN, 16 composition CD with various artists including Nakagawa, artists, community members and elementary school students, produced by Alan Nakagawa via Collage Ensemble Inc.

2001     MONKEY PETE, theme music for video and various live shows in Los Angeles, http://www.monkeypete.com

2001     SUN, Joji Okazaki, Smoggy Mountain, animation short, http://www.loungego.com

1999     RASTA RAMEN, (one song) Collage Ensemble Inc, guest artists on Other Vision’s Compilation, audio compact disc

1998     STATIC, Steven Irvin, performance at various venues in LA and Mexico City

1998     PRODUCE: A TWO FLAVOR PORTRAIT, composer of video score, Collage Ensemble Inc.

1994     DIE VERSE (a portrait of our town), Collage Ensemble Inc,. a collection of sound works from former installations, video projects and performances as well as new spoken word materials, collaboration with various artists, compact disc

1991     ONCE UPON A TIME, Cheri Gaulke, Video and installation, Pasadena Armory for the Arts

VIDEO

2013     GUS

2012     LINE TO LIGHTENING FIELD, group show, Lost Coast Culture machine, Fort Bragg, CA

2011     ISO CUBE, Iso Cube solo, on Vimeo.com

2011     RED FLAT, Alan Nakagawa for collaborative performances with Omayumi and Steve Irvin, various locations including the wulf, Japanese American Museum, Integratron and Mesa College

2010     PAPER FOOTBALL, Alan Nakagawa, Ear Meal Wencast

2008     FURBOWL, Otonomiyaki with Kio Griffith

2008     70 20 40 20, Otonomiyaki with Kio Griffith

2008     FOUND DISCO, Otonomiyaki with Kio Griffith

2008     LA IN PERPETUAM, Collage Ensemble Inc. with Mona Kasra, premiered at LACMA, LA, CA

2007     IN TENTS, video projection, with Mona Kasra

2006     LA Menu Munchies, DVD, Premiered September 7 @ the Japanese American National Museum, LA

2006     Amino Acids Micro Opera, Collage Ensemble Inc., Mona Kasra

2003     UTOPIA POP POP DOC VIDEO, half hour MiniDV documentary on Utopia Pop Pop, Collage Ensemble

2001     CAVE, video installation, collaboration with students from Covenant House, Collage Ensemble, Hollywood Branch Library, Hollywood

1998     UN(TITLED) the video, EZTV, 45 minutes, Beta SP, Collage Ensemble, Los Angeles, CA

1998     AS ABOVE SO BELOW, Collage Ensemble, LBMA, Video Annex, Long Beach, CA

1997     L.A. Hip Hop Video, Nakagawa, Gajin Fujita, Skept, Kris Kuramitsu, D-2, Collage Ensemble

1997     PRODUCE: A TWO FLAVOR PORTRAIT, Collage Ensemble Inc.

GROUP EXHIBITIONS/ PROJECTS

2014     REFLECTIONS IN REAL TIME, Camilo Cruz, Stanley Mosk Superior Courthouse, LA CA

2014     MONSTER RALLY, Pasadena Armory for the Arts, Pasadena CA

2014     PUT A RING ON IT, Yarn Bombers LA, photo contribution, Manhattan Beach Art Center, CA

2014     BLUES PROJECT by Kio Griffith, sound contribution, Tokyo Japan

2012     FINALE, group exhibit, Collage Ensemble Inc.’s last project, collaboration with the wulf. Inglewood Public Library

2010     EAR DIORAMA EAR, collaborative diorama and collages, Porter Gallery Long Beach, CA

2009     OMOCHA NO CHACHACHA, group exhibit, Café Bolivar

2008     EBBS AND FLOW, group exhibit, with Otonomiyaki, Eagle Rock Art Center, CA

2007     CIRCUMNAVIGATING THE SOUL, group exhibit, Pounder-Kone Art Space, Atwater, CA

2007     COLLECTIVE BARGAIN, group exhibit, curated by AM Project, Tree House Gallery, LA, CA

2007     Walk, walk, walk, artist book, group exhibit, Treehouse, LA, CA

2006     LA Menu Munchies, DVD, Premiered September 7 @ the Japanese American National Museum, LA

2004     MARKETS AS METAPHOR, Collage Ensemble Inc., North Spring Street Gallery, Chinatown, LA CA

2004     FINAL SHOW, group exhibit, London Street projects, Los Angeles, CA

2002     THAT PLACE, multi-media installation about survey, Collage Ensemble, Hollywood Branch Library

2001     CAVE, video with students from Covenant House, Collage Ensemble, Hollywood Branch Library, CA

1999     PACKAGE FROM L.A., Collage Ensemble Inc, distributed in Osaka, Japan

1998     LO CAL FROZEN BLUES, Collaboration, L.A. Stories: Engaging the City, Collage Ensemble, Pomona College, Claremont, CA

1998     ALL YOU CAN EAT, curator, group exhibition, Produced by Collage Ensemble, City Market of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

1997     FACADES, Collage Ensemble, group exhibition, Long Beach Museum of Art, CA

1993     SEED GAMES, Collage Ensemble Inc., group collaborative installation, Cerritos College, Norwalk

AWARDS AND GRANTS

2014     COLA, City Of Los Angeles Artist Fellowship, Department of Cultural Affairs, LA, CA

2013     Cultural Exchange International, University of Barcelona Artist in Residence, LA Department of Cultural Affairs

2013     USA Arts, crowd sourcing fundraiser for Sound Bed fabrication

2012     Mid-career Artist Fellowship, California Community Foundation

2011     Arts Grant, Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs

2011     Subido Grant, American Composers Forum

2011     DEW Foundation, Arts Grant

2010     Organizational Grant, DEW Foundation

2009     Glendale AZ Art Commission, temporary public art project, Otonimiyaki, Jazz and Blues Festival

2006     Los Angeles County Arts Commission, Collage Ensemble Inc

2005     Los Angeles County Arts Commission, Collage Ensemble Inc

2005     Cultural Affairs Department, Festival and Events Grant, OG3 Records/ St. Elmo Village

2004     Los Angeles County Arts Commission, Collage Ensemble Inc.

2004     Cultural Affairs Department, Festival and Events Grant, OG3 Records/ St. Elmo Village

2004     Cultural Affairs Department, Project Grant

2003     California Arts Council, Organizational Support, Collage Ensemble Inc.

2003     Cultural Affairs Project Grant, Collage Ensemble Inc.

2002     California Arts Council, Organizational Support, Collage Ensemble Inc.

2001     Cultural Affairs Project Grant, Collage Ensemble Inc.

2001     California Arts Council, Organizational Support, Collage Ensemble Inc.

2000     Cultural Affairs Project Grant, Collage Ensemble Inc.

1999     Anne and Kirk Douglas Playground Grant, (PACCE), Esperanza Elementary, L.A, CA

1998     Regional Arts Grant, (PACCE) Cultural Affairs Grant, Los Angeles, CA

1998     Youth Arts Services Grant, (PACCE) Cultural Affairs Grant, Los Angeles, CA

1996     Cultural Affairs Grant, Collage Ensemble Inc., Los Angeles CA

1995     LA PRODUCE DISTRICT Artist Residency, Collage Ensemble, Community Redevelopment Agency: Downtown Revitalization Project, Collage Ensemble Inc., LA, CA

1995     Brody Arts Fund, Organization Grant, Collage Ensemble Inc., LA, CA

1995     Project Grant, Collage Ensemble Inc., Osaka Cultural Affairs Department, Osaka, Japan

1994     CAC, Organizational Support Grant, Collage Ensemble Inc., California

1994     Fideicomiso Para LaCultura Mexico/USA, Rockefeller Foundation, Collage Ensemble Inc., Mexico City

PUBLICATIONS & MEDIA

2014     SOUNDSCAPE, Journal of Acoustic Ecology Vol. 12 Number 1

2014     Lime Light Exhibition, Forth Magazine2014 LIME LIGHT EXHIBITION, Bondo Wyszpolski, Easy Reader News

2014     ARTBOUND, KCET TV (in progress), directed by Tom Clancey and Produced by Juan Devis

2013     ALAN&EVA, CCCB Online Website, Barcelona, Spain

2013     ARTBOUND, KCET Internet

2012     Otis School of Art and design, OMAG, Alan Nakagawa

2012     Long Beach Gazzette, Soundwalk, Long Beach, CA

2012     ATLAS SETS, Glenn Bach

2011     WATT RADIO, Ear Diorama Ear

2011     GYST Radio, Interview

2010     Sushi and Sake, Alan Nakagawa Artist

2009     DEPARTMENT OF REAL ESTATE, one hour interview, KXLU FM, Los Angeles, CA

2009     SOUNDWALK, Ginger and Maryann, Otonomiyaki, Huell Howzer, KCET

2008     FOUND SOUND, LA Weekly, LA, CA

2007     FINGERED SEVEN, Pick of the week, performance at Highways, LA Weekly

2007     Collective Bargain, artist catalog, AM Projects, LA CA

2006     Amino Acids Micro Opera, Collage Ensemble Inc., 18th St. Arts Complex, LA Weekly Pick of the Week

2005     Soundwalk catalog, introduction essay zine, Flood, Long Beach, CA

2003     Utopia Pop Pop, article, Downtown News, LA CA LA Urban Folk, review, Tokion Magazine

2002     That Place, article, Hollywood Independent

2001     Tokion Tree Fund, review, Tokion Magazine

2000     FOURXFOUR, article, Tokion Magazine

1999     VIDEOS, L.A. Hip Hop Volume One, Rap Pages, U.S.A.

1998     Room with Views of L.A., William Wilson, L.A. Times, Los Angeles, CA

1998     LACE, XRAY L.A., KPFK FM, Los Angeles, CA

1997     COLLAGE ENSEMBLE INC., KXLU FM, Los Angeles, CA

1997     L.A. HIP HOP VIDEO VOLUME ONE, Art Crimes, web page

1997     L.A. HIP HOP VIDEO VOLUME ONE, Daily News, LA, CA

1997     Produce: a Two Flavor Portrait, Downtown news, LA, CA

1996     Art Cries, Full Moon Gallery, Los Angeles Times

1996     Microwaveable Soul Micro Opera, La Universal, Mexico City, Mexico

LECTURES & PANELS

2014     GRANTS PROGRAM, Panelist, City of Pasadena Cultural Affairs Department

2014     ART OPPORTUNTIES, Panelist, Metro Art, City of Santa Clarita, Santa Clarita, CA

2014     ISAMU NOGUCHI MUSEUM, BFA project critique, CAL Poly Pomona, CA

2013     ALAN NAKAGAWA, Sound Art and Experimental Music, Artist Residency, University of Barcelona

2013     ALAN NAKAGAWA, Oral History Techniques, University of Barcelona

2013     ALAN NAKAGAWA, Art Institute, San Bernardino CA

2013     ORGAN OF CORTI (excerpt), Alexis Disselkoen studio class, University of Southern California

2013     ISAMU NOGUCHI MUSEUM, BFA project critique, CAL Poly Pomona, CA

2013     ALAN NAKAGAWA, LA & Culture Class, University of Southern California

2012     ISAMU NOGUCHI MUSEUM, BFA project critique, CalPoly Pomona, CA

2011     METRO ART, Cultural Affairs Department, Denver CO.

2011     METRO ART, CalPoly Pomona, CA

2007     Get Your %#* Together, Side Street Projects, Pasadena, CA

2007     Public Art, National Association of Arts Organizations, LA, CA

2006     ALAN NAKAGAWA, Fine Arts department Lecturer Series, California State University Northridge

2005     PUBLIC ART, Chicago Transit Authority/ Cultural Affairs Department, Chicago, Ill

2004     PUBLIC ART, New Genre Class, California Institute of the Arts, Valencia, CA

2004     ALAN NAKAGAWA, New Genre Class, Claremont Graduate Program

2003     ALAN NAKAGAWA, Fine Arts department Lecturer Series, California State University Northridge

2003     ALAN NAKAGAWA, Fine Arts department Lecturer Series, University of California Irvine

2003     ALAN NAKAGAWA, Fine Arts Lecturer Class, University of California Los Angeles

2003     ROLE OF UTOPIA IN LA, Panel Mod., Japanese American Cultural and Community Center, LA, CA

2001     ALAN NAKAGAWA, Public Art Studies, University of Southern California

2000     NON-SANCTIONED PUBLIC ART, Americans for the Arts, Santa Monica, CA

2000     ALAN NAKAGAWA, USC, LA CA

1999     ALAN NAKAGAWA, CalArts, Valencia, CA

1999     PUBLIC ART, Calstate Northridge, CA

1999     PUBLIC ART, Nankai Railway, Osaka, Japan

1999     COMMUNITY ARTS, Association of Architects, Craftsman, and Artists, Tokyo, Japan

PUBLIC ART

2011     SOUND FOREST, CicLAvia

2008     PERCUSSION FOREST, BCAM opening, LACMA, LA, CA

2001     TILE PYRAMID, PACCE, Collage Ensemble, Esperanza Elementary School, LA CA

2001     PLAYGROUND STENCILS, a stencil project by students and artist Paul Botello, PACCE, Produced by Collage Ensemble, Esperanza Elementary School, LA, CA

2000     FOURXFOUR, billboard art project, collaboration with four graphic designers, Tokion Magazine and Collage Ensemble, four locations in Los Angeles

1997     PRODUCE: A TWO FLAVOR PORTRAIT, collaboration, Collage Ensemble, Community

Redevelopment Agency: Downtown Revitalization Project, LA, CA

1996     ANT HYMN, Collage Ensemble Inc., public installation collaboration, Anthem, Full Moon Gallery, curated by Monica Chau, FAR, Downtown Los Angeles

EDUCATION

2010     Oral History Program Workshops, University of California Los Angeles

1990     Theater Design, Japan University, Monbusho Scholarship, Tokyo, Japan

1988     Japanese Language, Osaka School of Foreign Studies, Monbusho Scholarship, Osaka, Japan

1988     MFA, Studio Arts, University of California Irvine

1986     BFA, Studio Arts, Otis Art Institute, Los Angeles, CA

(061414)

____________________

PAULIN PARIS

13703 Cordary Avenue

Hawthorne, CA, 90250

+ 1 310 644 3709

studio@paulinparis.com

 

LA based artist Paulin Paris is creating art projects in the US and abroad. Paris was born and raised in Paris, France, where he studied Philosophy and Art. His artistic and philosophical approach sees art as a spiritual path of symbolic dimension. Paris’ work transitions from painting, to mural, sculpture, photography, and print.

Exhibitions                                                                   2010 to present

2010     Cache Santa Monica

– Paulin Paris Ed Moses New Paintings

2010     Frank Pictures Bergamot Station, Santa Monica, CA

– Paulin Paris: Artwareness: Marquetry Paintings

2010     LA Contemporary, Los Angeles, CA

– Rogue Design 5 from CA

2012     Jack Rutberg, Los Angeles, CA

– Letters from Los Angeles, Part I & II

The Artlook

The artist studio is also a gallery space: The Artlook, presenting artists from the

US and Europe during special arts events.

Exhibitions                                                                   2011 to present

2011     – “Warp & Weft,” Paintings by Debrah Constance

2012     – “God Speed Rider,” Melissa Washington

2013     – “Mourners,” V. Morien; and “Recent Works,” Paulin Paris

2013     – “Blots: Paintings and Collages,” Robert Wilhite

2014     – Gouaches,” Martin Lacroix: and Portraits & Artscape,” Paulin Paris

2014     – “Supervision LA,” Olivier Mirguet; “Spice Girls,” Philippe Carpentier;

and “Symbolic Symbols,” Paulin Paris

____________________

JANE GILLESPIE PRYOR

jane.gillespie@gmail.com

 

Jane Gillespie is a Los Angles based artist. She received her MFA from Claremont Graduate university and her undergraduate degree from the University of Southern California. Jane’s work has been exhibited throughout Southern California and is part of the Los Angeles Metro’s public art collection. She was a Maguire Fellow and a recipient of the Joe Sonneman Photography Award. Currently, she is adjunct faculty at Biola University and Azusa Pacific University.

Gillespie’s work draws from both the domestic and nomadic, exploring the existence of a walled and wall-less life. The sculptural forms stand as boundary markers, similar to fences, property lines, or signposts. The all-white forms reference hunting traps, animal hides, and shelters. She uses geometric patterning to point to both interior dwellings and designs found within the natural world.

Education

MFA, 2011    Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA

BA, 2003      University of Southern California, Los Angles, CA

Exhibitions

Territory, 2014 (solo)

Greenleaf Gallery, Whittier College, Whittier, CA

Potential Bodies, 2014

Otis College of Art and Design, Culver City, CA

Lime Light, 2014

ThinhStudio, Cordary Art Event, Hawthorne, CA

Here For Now, 2012 (solo)

Nixon Gallery, Whittier Public Library, Whittier, CA

MFA Faculty, 2011

L Gallery, Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, CA

Boom. Southern California MFA Exhibition, 2011

LA Mart, Los Angles, CA

Housewarming, Curated by Allison Alford, 2011

Eagle Rock, CA

Jane Gillespie Pryor, 2011 (solo)

East Gallery, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA

Video Work by Claremont Graduate University Artists, 2010

Projections on Lake, Pasadena, CA

Second Year MFA Exhibition, 2010

Peggy Phelps Gallery, Claremont Graduate University

In the House of Make-Believe, 2010

Division 9 Gallery, Riverside, CA

Exhibit A, 2009

East Gallery, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont CA

Set Free, 2009

Bluebird Art House, Whittier, CA

Under the Cover of Trees, 2008

L’KEG Gallery, Echo Park, CA

Teaching

Adjunct Professor of Art, 2011-Current

Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, CA

Adjunct Professor of Art, 2011-Current

Biola University, La Mirada, CA

Panels and Discussions

Visiting Lecturer, 2014

Whittier College, Whittier, CA

Juror, Through the Eyes of the Artist, 2014

Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro), Los Angeles, CA

Visiting Artist, 2011

Chaffey College, Rancho Cucamonga, CA

Awards

Joe Sonneman Photography Prize, 2011

Maguire Teaching Fellowship, 2010-2011

Claremont Graduate University Fellowship, 2010

Claremont Graduate University Fellowship, 2009

Public Collections

Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro), Los Angeles, CA

____________________

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